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I am trying to build a tree to store USB device information. I thought that I would use NSMutableArray and NSMutableDictionary to contain this information. My problem is that I've never studied software engineering - I'm learning as I go - and I haven't the faintest idea about tree theory.
I'm basing my tree on the USB Location ID, which is eight nibbles long. As I understand it, each nibble represents a layer of the tree (if you see what I mean). I've written a little bit of test code to see if I can build my tree properly - and, sadly, it seems that I can't!

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

#define MAXCHILDREN 0xf

NSDictionary* AddItemToTree(NSDictionary* nodeEntry, unsigned int value, int depth)
{
    // Convert the value into a set of nibbles
    char *bytes = (char *)&value;
    char byte = bytes[depth];

    NSMutableDictionary* thisEntry = [[[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithDictionary:nodeEntry] autorelease];

    if (byte == 0)
    {
        [thisEntry setObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%08x",value] forKey:@"Value"];
        [thisEntry setObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%08x",byte] forKey:@"Byte"];
        [thisEntry setObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:depth] forKey:@"Depth"];

        return thisEntry;
    }



    if(![[thisEntry allKeys]containsObject:@"ChildEntries"])
    {
        NSMutableArray* childArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc]init];
        NSMutableDictionary* newNode = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];

        [childArray addObject:AddItemToTree(newNode,value,++depth)];

        [thisEntry setObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:depth] forKey:@"Depth"];
        [thisEntry setObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%08x",value] forKey:@"Value"];
        [thisEntry setObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%08x",byte] forKey:@"Byte"];
        [thisEntry setObject:childArray forKey:@"ChildEntries"];


        [newNode release];
        [childArray release];

    }
    else
    {
        [[thisEntry objectForKey:@"ChildEntries"]addObject:AddItemToTree(thisEntry,value, ++depth)];

    }


    return thisEntry;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];


    NSMutableDictionary* treenode=[[NSMutableDictionary alloc]init];

    char bytearray[4] = {0x0F, 0x0F, 0x02, 0x00};
    unsigned int *value = (unsigned int*)bytearray;
    char bytearray2[4] = {0x0F, 0x02, 0x00, 0x00};
    unsigned int *value2 = (unsigned int*)bytearray2;
    char bytearray3[4] = {0x0F, 0x02, 0x00, 0x00};
    unsigned int *value3 = (unsigned int*)bytearray3;


    [treenode setObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:0] forKey:@"Depth"];
    [treenode setObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%08x",*value] forKey:@"Value"];
    [treenode setObject:AddItemToTree(treenode,*value, 0) forKey:@"ChildEntries"];

//    [[treenode objectForKey:@"ChildEntries"]addObject:AddItemToTree(treenode,*value2, 0)];


    [treenode writeToFile:@"/Users/headbanger/Desktop/test.plist" atomically:YES];

    [pool release];
}

Adding one USB location ID works perfectly. Adding a second (by uncommenting-out the line in main) causes SIGABRT. I'm sure that it's perfectly simple, and I've committed a typical newbie error. However, it's not obvious to me and any help that you can provide would be more than welcome.
My tree will need to look something like this:

F-
 |--F-
 |   |--2
 |
 |--2

This tree should be true even if an attempt is made to add the third byte array.
If you can answer the question without being USB specific then that would be most helpful, because I'd really like to understand about trees and what I've done wrong. That said, if there's a quick and easy way to get a tree built for me in Objective-C then I'd love to hear it.
So please, experts, can someone tell me what I'm doing wrong? Thank you for your time.

share|improve this question
    
I think you need to get a big sheet of paper and walk through your algorithm on paper. Generally your tree root should be a global pointer that isn't changed once the root is allocated. –  Hot Licks Jan 29 '13 at 18:53
    
Hot Licks, thank you for taking the time to reply. I'm not certain that I entirely understand your suggestion - I did walk through already on paper (I'd never have gotten as far as I have, otherwise!) Do you know of any tutorials that I can follow? Or could you provide a specific suggestions with reference to my code. That might help me understand what you mean. –  headbanger Jan 29 '13 at 20:31
    
@HotLicks: Why should it be global? Globals are usually ill-advised. –  Marcelo Cantos Jan 29 '13 at 20:45
    
Globals are relative. The root should be anchored somewhere outside of the method. –  Hot Licks Jan 29 '13 at 20:46
    
@HotLicks: That doesn't conform to any definition of "global" I've ever encountered. –  Marcelo Cantos Jan 29 '13 at 20:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One problem is that you set dictionary as the type of the ChildEntries:

[treenode setObject:AddItemToTree(treenode,*value, 0) forKey:@"ChildEntries"];

but elsewhere you attempt to use it as a NSMutableArray (mind the addObject: method):

[[thisEntry objectForKey:@"ChildEntries"]addObject:AddItemToTree(thisEntry,value, ++depth)];

To fix it, in your main you could do

[treenode setObject:[[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithObjects:AddItemToTree(treenode,*value, 0), nil]forKey:@"Children"];

but even when your recursion progresses towards the 0x00 byte if (byte==0), I think, from mentally inspecting it, that it's going to add duplicated children and produce a reeeally deep tree.

There is something wrong with your environment if you didn't get a message warning you of the wrong method addObject with the SIGABORT.

Btw, it's hard to read. Lines like these

[treenode setObject:[[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithObjects:AddItemToTree(treenode,*value, 0), nil]forKey:@"Children"];

are easier to scan and less prone to mistakes if you write:

NSString * const kChildren = @"Children";
// ...
NSMutableArray *children = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithObjects:AddItemToTree(treenode,*value, 0), nil];
[treenode setObject:children forKey:kChildren];

The style is not very objective-c-ish, you could use NSUInteger and NSData instead unsigned int and char arrays.


You should first write a generic tree, then use it for your purposes. This is my tree example. It's ugly but it's mine. As you see, it's common sense. You could set conditions like, two childs per node, and left child < root < right child, and then you would get a binary search tree which has better properties to find stuff. But that will take you a lot more code I guess.

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

typedef NS_ENUM(unsigned char, MyTreeVisitingOrder) {
    MyTreeOrderDepthFirst,
    MyTreeOrderValueFirst
};

#define Tree NSObject<MyTree>

@protocol MyTree
@property (nonatomic,strong) NSObject<NSCopying>* key;
@property (nonatomic,strong) NSObject *value;
@property (nonatomic,strong) NSMutableDictionary *children;
-(void) insertChild:(Tree*)node;
-(void) each:(void(^)(NSObject*))block order:(MyTreeVisitingOrder)order;
@end


@interface TreeImpl : NSObject <MyTree>
-(id) init __attribute__((unavailable("disabled")));
@end

@implementation TreeImpl

@synthesize key = _key;
@synthesize value = _value;
@synthesize children = _children;


-(id) initWithKey:(NSObject<NSCopying>*)key value:(NSObject*)value {
    self = [super init];
    if (self){
        _key = key;
        _value = value;
        _children = [NSMutableDictionary new];
    }
    return self;
}


-(void) insertChild:(Tree*)node {
    [_children setObject:node forKey:node.key];
}

-(void) each:(void(^)(NSObject*))block order:(MyTreeVisitingOrder)order {
    switch (order) {
        case MyTreeOrderDepthFirst:{
            if (_children) {
                for (id key in _children){
                    [[_children objectForKey:key] each:block order:order];
                }
            }
            block(_value);
            break;
        }
        case MyTreeOrderValueFirst:{
            block(_value);
            if (_children) {
                for (id key in _children){
                    [[_children objectForKey:key] each:block order:order];
                }
            }
            break;
        }
    }
}

@end


int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    @autoreleasepool {

        TreeImpl *a = [[TreeImpl alloc] initWithKey:@"A" value:@"A"];
        TreeImpl *b = [[TreeImpl alloc] initWithKey:@"B" value:@"B"];
        TreeImpl *c = [[TreeImpl alloc] initWithKey:@"C" value:@"C"];
        [a insertChild:b];
        [a insertChild:c];

        [a each:^(NSObject* value) {
            NSLog(@"> %@",value);
        } order:MyTreeOrderValueFirst];
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Jano, I will give this a go and see if I have the wit to adapt it to my purposes. I still can't see what's wrong with my attempt though - are you able to identify what I've mucked up in my code (I was feeling quite pleased with my first stab at a tree!) –  headbanger Jan 30 '13 at 14:30
    
I edited the answer. –  Jano Jan 30 '13 at 16:16
    
It's clever, but you should aim to write it so you don't have to execute the code mentally to understand it. That often means splitting code in methods that do one thing only. Don't aim for short code, aim for readability from a high level. –  Jano Jan 30 '13 at 17:03
    
Wow! Thank you for your help. The tree isn't deep - and, as I say, it works for one usb entry (the trouble comes when adding additional entries!) Looking at your example code, I thought I could try to use that - see if I could understand what's going on. I can't though. I'm afraid that I can't work out how to call it. What would the 'main' be for an example use of your code? I'm not too worried about search speed - after all, it can only be a maximum of 16*8 devices. Not too onerous on a modern system. –  headbanger Jan 30 '13 at 17:09
    
oh I was wrong I guess. I'll edit with a working example tomorrow (if I remember!). But if your example works as it is now, all good. –  Jano Jan 30 '13 at 17:57

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