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I want to write a script (shell script or awk) to print $1 (first field) of duplicate entry all to gather and then use the last value to find difference between last and first entry or may be note the difference of value at every duplicate entry.

For example my files has following entries:

counter1 is 100

counter2 is 200

counter3 is 300

counter1 is 1000

counter2 is 2000

counter3 is 3000

counter1 is 10000

counter2 is 20000

counter3 is 30000

I want to print: counter1 is 100

counter1 is 1000

counter1 is 10000

counter2 is 200

counter2 is 2000

counter2 is 20000

counter3 is 300

counter3 is 3000

counter3 is 30000

Now each counter has some value incremented so I want to find difference between each value of same counter:

counter1 is 100

counter1 is 1000 | difference 1000-100 = 900

counter1 is 10000| difference 10000-100= 9900

I was able to print duplicate entries but not able to bunch them, its appearing in the same sequence as file has.

MacBook-Air:linuxscripts jimdev$ awk 'NR==FNR && a[$1]++ {b[$1];next} $1 in b' FS=" " countr.txt countr.txt

counter1 is 100

counter2 is 200

counter3 is 300

counter1 is 1000

counter2 is 2000

counter3 is 3000

counter1 is 10000

counter2 is 20000

counter3 is 30000

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming that your data is in a file called data.txt. You can get it with a sort and an awk simple if (or using patterns):

sort data.txt | awk 'BEGIN{last = ""; value = 0;} {if ($1 == last) {print $1" is "$3" | difference "$3"-"value" = "($3-value)}else{last = $1; value = $3; print $1" is "$3;}}' -

Explanation: first of all sort the input to have "counters" in ascending order. Then here we go with the AWK expression:

  1. We use 2 temporal variables: last, that stores the current counter, and the value of the first counter. We initialize it in the BEGIN part of the AWK script: BEGIN{last = ""; value = 0;}.

Now, for each line we execute the following code:

if ($1 == last) {
    print $1" is "$3" | difference "$3"-"value" = "($3-value);
} else {
    last = $1;
    value = $3;
    print $1" is "$3;
}

line 1: compare the first field (counter) to last, that stores the last counter tag in order to know if we should print the difference.

line 2: if the current line has the same counter tag than the previous one we print the difference.

line 3: Else, it is a base case, so we save the current counter tag in order to compare with the next line, its value to calculate the difference and we print the line.

  1. If the new line has the same that same counter tag than the previous one, we keep the values and calculate the difference to the first value of this counter. Else, we store the new counter tag (in last variable) and its value (in value) and we just print the line.

Here is the output for your input sample:

counter1 is 100
counter1 is 1000 | difference 1000-100 = 900
counter1 is 10000 | difference 10000-100 = 9900
counter2 is 200
counter2 is 2000 | difference 2000-200 = 1800
counter2 is 20000 | difference 20000-200 = 19800
counter3 is 300
counter3 is 3000 | difference 3000-300 = 2700
counter3 is 30000 | difference 30000-300 = 29700
share|improve this answer
    
hey, we almost have the same solution ^^ except he insisted on "last field" so I used $NF instead of $3 ... And I chose patterns instead of if, but this is clearly the same algorithm. high five ^^ –  Olivier Dulac Jan 29 '13 at 19:35
    
Jajaja Even the sort before the AWK !! I mentioned in my answer to use patterns instead of an if statement before have a look to your solution, although patterns are more elegant, I thought that an if would be easier for a beginner. Congrats for your solution !! –  arutaku Jan 29 '13 at 19:39
    
Arutaku, here is the output –  devnp Jan 29 '13 at 19:44
    
MacBook-Air:linuxscripts jimdev$ sort countr.txt | awk 'BEGIN{last = ""; value = 0;} {if ($1 == last) {print $1" is "$3" | difference "$3"-"value" = "($3-value)}else{last = $1; value = $3; print $1" is "$3;}}' is | difference -0 = 0 is | difference -0 = 0 is | difference -0 = 0 counter1 is 100 counter1 is 1000 | difference 1000-100 = 900 counter1 is 10000 | difference 10000-100 = 9900 counter2 is 200 counter2 is 2000 | difference 2000-200 = 1800 counter2 is 20000 | difference 20000-200 = 19800 counter3 is 300 counter3 is 3000 | difference 3000-300 = 2700 counter3 is 30000 | difference 3 –  devnp Jan 29 '13 at 19:45
    
That is because you have empty lines in your input file, isn't it?? You can remove them, add a |grep -v "^$"| as Olivier suggested or add an if statement in AWK checking if (NF != 3) { ... }. And that's it ! –  arutaku Jan 29 '13 at 19:47

does this work for you?

sort countr.txt | grep -v '^$'  | awk '
BEGIN { field1="different" ; firstval="0" ; }
     $1 !~ field1 { print $0 ; field1 = $1 ; firstval = $NF ; continue;}
     $1  ~ field1 { print $0 " | difference " $NF "-" firstval " = " $NF-firstval ; }'

and here is the output on the input file as shown in your post :

counter1 is 100
counter1 is 1000 | difference 1000-100 = 900
counter1 is 10000 | difference 10000-100 = 9900
counter2 is 200
counter2 is 2000 | difference 2000-200 = 1800
counter2 is 20000 | difference 20000-200 = 19800
counter3 is 300
counter3 is 3000 | difference 3000-300 = 2700
counter3 is 30000 | difference 30000-300 = 29700
share|improve this answer
    
and you can pretty print the whole thing with use of printf and "%40s" or "%-40s" kind of things –  Olivier Dulac Jan 29 '13 at 19:27
    
MacBook-Air:linuxscripts jimdev$ sort countr.txt | grep -v '^$' | awk' BEGIN { field1="different" ; firstval="0" ; } $1 !~ field1 { print $0 ; field1 = $1 ; firstval = $NF ; continue;} $1 ~ field1 { print $0 " | difference " $NF "-" firstval " = " $NF-firstval > it prints > not sure if I am not copying it properly –  devnp Jan 29 '13 at 19:41
    
Didnt copy properly but it give me some error: MacBook-Air:linuxscripts jimdev$ sort countr.txt | grep -v '^$' | awk 'BEGIN { field1="different" ; firstval="0" ; } $1 !~ field1 { print $0 ; field1 = $1 ; firstval = $NF ; continue;} $1 ~ field1 { print $0 " | difference " $NF "-" firstval " = " $NF-firstval ; }' awk: continue illegal outside of loops at source line 1 context is BEGIN { field1="different" ; firstval="0" ; } $1 !~ field1 { print $0 ; field1 = $1 ; firstval =(NF) ; >>> continue;} <<< –  devnp Jan 29 '13 at 19:49
    
Thanks Olivier for your help –  devnp Jan 29 '13 at 20:24
    
you can just copy/paste the whole block, it's better (as syntax is very precise). I'm glad if it helped –  Olivier Dulac Jan 30 '13 at 8:54

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