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As an exercise I decided to create a bicycle gear calculator in WPF. I created two private fields with setters that trigger OnPropertyChanged(), but I have one databound property, ratio, which behaves as "readonly", because it is dynamically calculated. When I run the program, the textboxes show, the initial values are correctly displayed, the "working" word in the property changed handler is displayed, but the ratio TextBlock doesn't update.

I suspect this is due to the way the property is "getted", I wonder if it would be absolutely necessary to add a private field for every, I wonder if there should be any DependencyProperty in this... But actually I have reached my knowledge limit on this and cannot get this trivial program to work.


This is my model:

class SingleGearsetModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public SingleGearsetModel()
    {
        crank = 44;
        cog = 16;
    }

    private int _crank;
    private int _cog;

    public int crank { 
        get{return _crank;}
        set{
            _crank = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("crank");
        }
    }

    public int cog {
        get{return _cog;}
        set{
            _cog = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("cog");
        } 
    }

    public double ratio
    {
        get {
            return (double)crank / (double)cog;
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string arg)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(arg));
            Console.Writeline("working");
        }
    }

} // end class

This is my XAML:

<Window
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    x:Class="CalculadorFixaWPF.MainWindow"
    x:Name="Window"
    Title="MainWindow"
    Width="640" Height="480">

    <DockPanel x:Name="LayoutRoot">
            <TextBox Text="{Binding crank, Mode=TwoWay}"/>
            <TextBox Text="{Binding cog, Mode=TwoWay}"/>
            <TextBlock Text="{Binding ratio, StringFormat={}{0:0.00}}"/>
    </DockPanel>
</Window>

And this is in my code-behind (MainWindow.xaml.cs):

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        this.InitializeComponent();
        this.DataContext = new SingleGearsetModel();
    }
}

Thanks for reading!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since Ratio is a calculated field, you want to add a notification every time the value might change. This will happen if crank or cog are changed.

So, after you notify on them being changed, also notify thatratio has changed:

public int crank 
{ 
    get{return _crank;}
    set{
        _crank = value;
        OnPropertyChanged("crank");

        // *** Notify that ratio has also been changed ***
        OnPropertyChanged("ratio");
    }
}

Same goes for cog.

Edit: Based on your comments, here is how you can register to the PropertyChanged event from inside your class and raise a PropertyChanged for ratio:

// Constructor
public SingleGearsetModel()
{
    ....
   PropertyChanged += SingleGearsetModel_PropertyChanged;
}

// PropertyChanged event handler
void SingleGearsetModel_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
        if (e.PropertyName == "cog" || e.PropertyName == "crank")
        {
            OnPropertyChanged("ratio");
        }
}

Using this approach, you don't need to add the OnPropertyChanged("ratio") inside the setters of the properties - whenever they are raised, you get the event(in SingleGearsetModel_PropertyChanged) and raise the OnPropertyChanged("ratio")

share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Just for the sake of completeness, let's suppose I had something similar to "Excel" spreadsheet, where just a few values (properties) are explicit, and a lot more are just calculated. I have seen some javascript code which had some "refresh()" or "update()" function to recalculate everything, setting the private fields in the process, but this sounds non-elegant under the light of databinding. Do you think your last approach could be used to handle A LOT of calculated values (without setters, just getters) without a lot of bug-prone, repeated "notifier" code? –  heltonbiker Jan 30 '13 at 17:04
    
Short answer - it depends :) Long answer: In the case of an Excel spreadsheet that has a high number of these "Calculate Fields" and a small amount of real values, a different approach might be used (such as each calculated field is smarter, it knows who it is dependent on and therefore will trigger the propertychanged for itself). But an Excel spreadsheet is something altogether different and therefore might not be a good comparison. In most of the standard cases this solution is quite adequate - even if you have more logic then a single if statement. –  Blachshma Jan 30 '13 at 17:21
1  
Ok, I think that settles the question for simple projects like this one, and you pointed a sensible direction for larger ones. Thanks for your interest! –  heltonbiker Jan 30 '13 at 17:51

The most trivial way would just be to add OnPropertyChanged("ratio") to the setters for both crank and cog. You can do more sophisticated things along the lines of listening for the OnPropertyChanged event from crank and cog and automatically firing OnPropertyChanged("ratio") if either of them change, but this will at least get you going.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you suggest some way (code?) to implement that second option you mention (triggering ratio change from either crank or cog without duplicated code)? –  heltonbiker Jan 29 '13 at 19:15
    
(it would be interesting for ratio to "listen" to cog and crank, so I could make (in the future) development_meters listen to ratio and wheel_radius, speed listen to development_meters and cadence_RPM, and so on, instead of a lot of duplicated code) –  heltonbiker Jan 29 '13 at 19:19

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