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I have a number like 600000. I want to insert space after every 2 digit. How can I do it? The result should be 60 00 00.

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what do you want for 1234567? –  ysth Jan 29 '13 at 19:32
1  
perldoc.perl.org/… –  toolic Jan 29 '13 at 20:01
    
@toolic, this one out-performs the FAQ. –  Axeman Jan 29 '13 at 20:14

4 Answers 4

If 12345 should become 12 34 5, I recommend

s/..(?!\z)\K/ /sg

The (?!\z) ensures that you don't add a trailing space.


If 12345 should become 1 23 45, I recommend

s/(?!^)(?=(?:..)+(?!.))/ /sg

(?!^) ensures you don't add a leading space.

This isn't very efficient. It might be more efficient to reverse the input, use the first solution, then reverse the output.

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Compared a few different methods of doing this. I assumed that you didn't want to modify the original string, otherwise the 100% regex version might have done better.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Benchmark ();

my $x = "1234567890";

Benchmark::cmpthese(1_000_000, {
    unpack   => sub { join(" ", unpack("(A2)*", $x)) },
    regex    => sub { (my $y = $x) =~ s/..(?!\z)\K/ /sg; $y },
    regex514 => sub { $x =~ s/..(?!\z)\K/ /sgr },
    join     => sub { join(" ", $x =~ /..?/sg) },
    });

Seems that using unpack() is the fastest

             Rate     join    regex regex514   unpack
join     221828/s       --     -18%     -26%     -42%
regex    271665/s      22%       --     -10%     -29%
regex514 300933/s      36%      11%       --     -22%
unpack   383877/s      73%      41%      28%       --
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Try this:

$number = '600000';
$number =~ s/(\d{2})(?!$)/$1 /g;
print $number;

(\d{2}) means 'two numerical digits'. (?!$) means 'as long as the end of the string isn't immediately afterwards', as there's no need for a space after the number.

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(\d{2}) means 'two numerical digits'. (?!$) means 'as long as the end of the string isn't immediately afterwards', as there's no need for a space after the number. –  AgileTillIDie Jan 29 '13 at 19:39
1  
(?!$) doesn't quite mean that, but (?!\z) would. Also, \K would be more efficient. –  ikegami Jan 29 '13 at 19:58
    
Thanx a lot!!!! –  user2013387 Jan 29 '13 at 22:06

Here's another option:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $number = 600000;
my $spacedNum = join ' ', $number =~ /..?/g;
print $spacedNum;

Output:

60 00 00
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