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I can't understand why the following code is not working, any idea ?

template <class T>
class Matrice
{
public:
...
    typedef typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator const_iterator;
    const_iterator& cend ( )
    {
        return valeurs.cend ( );
    }
...
private:
...
}

here's the complilator's complaint :

/Users/Aleks/Documents/DS OO/DS OO/Matrice.h:70:16: Non-const lvalue reference to type 'const_iterator' (aka '__wrap_iter') cannot bind to a temporary of type 'const_iterator' (aka '__wrap_iter')

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2  
Change return type to const_iterator: not a reference. –  hmjd Jan 29 '13 at 20:26
    
Yeah ! I should have read the complaint more carefully... Thanks ! Maybe you could explain me why can't it be a reference ? –  Aleks Jan 29 '13 at 20:28
    
Because you can't bind non-const lvalue references to temporaries? :D –  Bill Jan 29 '13 at 20:29
4  
@Aleks: for the reason the compiler says: it would bind to a temporary object. The value returned by valuers.cend() is a temporary object, and it will go out of scope when returning from your cend() function. Thus, you would be returning a reference to an object that has gone out of scope. Deferencing it would be Undefined Behavior. –  Andy Prowl Jan 29 '13 at 20:31
1  
There is value in reading what the compiler is trying to tell you. Absurd as it might look, it is what the compiler believes that your code does. Once you know what it thinks, you can go back to your code and understand why it believes that to be the case. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 29 '13 at 20:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

valeurs.cend (cppreference) returns an instance to a const_iterator (that is, it's declared as const_iterator valeurs.cend()).

The compiler needs to create a temporary object (memory area) to store the value returned by valeurs.cend(). This code fails to compile because you cannot take the reference of a temporary as the latter won't outlive the function call.

You'd usually return an iterator by value:

typedef typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator const_iterator;
const_iterator cend ( )
{
    return valeurs.cend ( );
}

This will make sure the value returned by valeurs.cend() is copied (or moved, in C++11, I believe) to its the destination object (if you're assigning the returned value to a variable of type const_iterator) or in another temporary wherever Matrice<T>::cend() is called. See the link to MSDN's explanation for details.

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hmjd is right, you need just const_iterator, not a reference. The reason you can't use a reference is that valeurs.cend () is a temporary value on the stack, the reference (if you could use it) wouldn't be valid as soon as the function returns.

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As others have said, the following line:

const_iterator& cend ( )

Needs to be either:

const const_iterator& cend ( )

Or:

const_iterator cend ( )
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