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When I perform the following query

select * from table where c2 = 11 or c3 = 15 or c7 = false

I'm getting this result

| c1 | c2 | c3 | c4  | c5  | c6      | c7     | c8        |
| 24 | 11 | 15 | NNN | NNN |         | true   | false     |
| 28 | 11 | 13 | NNN | NNN |         | true   | false     |
| 26 | 11 | 15 | NNN | NNN | wwwww   | false  | false     |
| 25 | 11 | 2  | NNN | NNN | qqqq    | false  | false     |
| 33 | 23 | 31 | NNN | NNN |         | false  | false     |
| 31 | 23 | 15 | NNN | NNN |         | false  | false     |
| 31 | 23 | 15 | NNN | NNN |         | true   | false     |
| 25 | 11 | 23 | NNN | NNN | qqqqw2  | false  | false     |
| 29 | 11 | 22 | NNN | NNN |         | true   | false     |

I'm trying to order this by search coincidences, like this:

| c1 | c2 | c3 | c4  | c5  | c6      | c7    | c8        |
| 26 |[11]|[15]| NNN | NNN | wwwww   |[false]| false     |
| 24 |[11]|[15]| NNN | NNN |         | true  | false     |
| 25 |[11]| 2  | NNN | NNN | qqqq    |[false]| false     |
| 31 | 23 |[15]| NNN | NNN |         |[false]| false     |
| 25 |[11]| 23 | NNN | NNN | qqqqw2  |[false]| false     |
| 28 |[11]| 13 | NNN | NNN |         | true  | false     |
| 29 |[11]| 22 | NNN | NNN |         | true  | false     |
| 31 | 23 |[15]| NNN | NNN |         | true  | false     |
| 33 | 23 | 31 | NNN | NNN |         |[false]| false     |

So the row that has the 3 options will be on top then the all the rows that matches at least 2 optiones (in no specific order) and last all the rows that matches 1 option,

Is there a way to achieve this order? because the other option I have is doing combination of options with and statement and then use union with all the results, but it seems to be a lot more

Thanks in advance

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to add an order by clause:

order by (case when c2 = 11 then 1 else 0 end) +
         (case when c3 = 15 then 1 else 0 end) +
         (case when c7 = false then 1 else 0 end) desc

(SQL Fiddle example)

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Thanks for your response. One more question, lets suppose my table has 20 columns (as an example), and my query will use 9 columns. Do I have to do this? –  JavierQQ23 Jan 29 '13 at 20:51
    
@JavierQQ23 . . . I'm not sure what you means by "Do I have to do this?". If you want the results ordered, then you need an order by clause. If you want them ordered by the number of column matches, then you need something a lot like this. –  Gordon Linoff Jan 29 '13 at 21:03
    
Suppose my question is different and ... –  wildplasser Jan 29 '13 at 22:27
    
Sorry for not being clear, if I have 9 more options do I have to write each case line?. I'm wondering if postgres can do that kind of rank by itself or maybe I'm asking too much :). Anyway thanks again –  JavierQQ23 Jan 30 '13 at 1:28
    
@JavierQQ23 . . . Well yes. Or you can take the approach suggested by Clodoaldo, although I think the case statement is clearer. –  Gordon Linoff Jan 30 '13 at 1:41
order by
    (c2 = 11)::integer + (c3 = 15)::integer + (not c7)::integer desc

Stealing from @Gordon's example

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Thanks for your alternative :) –  JavierQQ23 Jan 30 '13 at 1:30

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