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A piece of code is worth a thousand words:

int main()
{
    // All of the following calls return true:
    AreEqual(1, 1);
    AreEqual(1, 1, 1);
    AreEqual(1, 1, 1, 1);
    AreEqual(1, 1, 1, 1, 1);

    // All of the following calls return false:
    AreEqual(1, 2);
    AreEqual(1, 2, 1);
    AreEqual(1, 7, 3, 1);
    AreEqual(1, 4, 1, 1, 1);    
}

How to implement the function AreEqual() that accepts arbitrary number of arguments?

The trivial but tedious soultion is through overloading:

bool AreEqual(int v1, int v2);
bool AreEqual(int v1, int v2, int v3);
bool AreEqual(int v1, int v2, int v3, int v4);
......

Another trivial but not workable solution is:

bool AreEqual(...);

This solution is not workable, because the caller must add another argument (argument count or ending marker) to specify the number of the arguments.

Yet another way is through variadic template arguments

template<class... Args>
bool AreEqual(Args... args)
{
    // What should be placed here ???
}
share|improve this question
    
By 'arbitrary', do you mean "integral numbers each of an arbitrary type (e.g. the first two are ints and the third is long)" or "an arbitrary number of arguments of the same type"? –  Utaal Jan 29 '13 at 20:50
    
You can declare the arguments as long long and you will be able to pass ints, shorts, longs, chars, bools, anything with less precision. –  ValekHalfHeart Jan 29 '13 at 20:52
    
And why exactly do you want to avoid using f(...)? –  bames53 Jan 29 '13 at 20:54
    
@bames53, This solution is not workable, because the caller must pass an argument to specify the number of the arguments. –  xmllmx Jan 29 '13 at 20:55
    
@ValekHalfHeart sure, but this will both force a conversion (probably not a big deal) and possibly prevent the function from being used with custom integer-like types (e.g. big-ints). @Rob's solution, for example, works with every type for which operator== is defined. –  Utaal Jan 29 '13 at 20:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here is how one can implement it with templates:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

template<class T0>
bool AreEqual(T0 t0) { return true; }

template<class T0, class T1, class... Args>
bool AreEqual(T0 t0, T1 t1, Args ... args) {
  return t0 == t1 && AreEqual(t1, args...);
}


int main () {
  std::cout << std::boolalpha;

    // All of the following calls return true:
  std::cout<< AreEqual(1, 1) << "\n";
  std::cout<< AreEqual(1, 1, 1) << "\n";
  std::cout<< AreEqual(1, 1, 1, 1) << "\n";
  std::cout<< AreEqual(1, 1, 1, 1, 1) << "\n\n";

    // All of the following calls return false:
  std::cout<< AreEqual(1, 2) << "\n";
  std::cout<< AreEqual(1, 2, 1) << "\n";
  std::cout<< AreEqual(1, 7, 3, 1) << "\n";
  std::cout<< AreEqual(1, 4, 1, 1, 1)  << "\n";
}

You should consider whether these variations are appropriate for your use:

  • Use references instead of pass-by-value
  • Make the non-variadic template take two parameters instead of one.


Alternatively, here is a non-recursive version. Sadly, it does not short-curcuit. To see a non-recursive short-circuiting version see the other answer.

template<typename T, typename... Args>
bool AreEqual(T first, Args... args)
{
  return std::min({first==args...});
}


Finally, this version is attractive in its lack of subtlety:

template<typename T, typename... Args>
bool AreEqual(T first, Args... args)
{
  for(auto i : {args...})
    if(first != i)
      return false;
  return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
They should probably be inline. –  Utaal Jan 29 '13 at 21:05
1  
@Utaal: Why? Templates already have an ODR "exception" of sorts. –  GManNickG Jan 29 '13 at 21:39
    
@GManNickG I'm referring to performance / code size, not repeated definitions. If I'm not mistaken, AreEqual(1, 4, 1, 1, 1) is expanded to 5 non-template "functions" (the first taking 5 arguments and the last taking just one). This means that, without inlining, you'd pay the pretty big overhead of 5 function calls just to compute equality of 5 ints. I haven't been able to confirm this yet but it feels like a compiler should be able to inline all those calls. –  Utaal Jan 29 '13 at 21:49
3  
If your compiler is any good, it will generate inline code (or not) completely independently of whether you use the inline keyword. –  Robᵩ Jan 29 '13 at 21:53
    
@Robᵩ, @GManNickG - uh oh, I've googled around and just realized I've been using inline for (mostly) the wrong reasons. I knew inline is often ignored but I did not know that non-inline funcs are inlined anyway. –  Utaal Jan 29 '13 at 22:34

Since you seem to be ruling out the sensible way to do it for some reason you could also try using std::initializer_list:

template<typename T>
bool AreEqual(std::initializer_list<T> list) {
    ...
}

Then you'd call it like:

AreEqual({1,1,1,1,1});
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Enables the beatiful implementations return std::adjacent_find(list.begin(), list.end(), std::not_equal_to<T>()) == list.end(); or return std::all_of(std::next(list.begin()), list.end(), std::bind(std::equal_to<T>(), *list.begin(), std::placeholders::_1)); (which is less beatiful for its special treatment of the first element, but properly uses == instead of !=, though == should be synced with != anyway). –  Christian Rau Jan 31 '13 at 10:01

Here is a non-recursive version:

template <typename T> using identity = T;

template<typename T, typename... Args>
bool AreEqual(T first, Args... args)
{
  bool tmp = true;
  identity<bool[]>{tmp?tmp=first==args:true ...};
  return tmp;
}

With optimizations on, there is no overhead compared to the recursive functions except that the behavior can be different since all arguments are compared to the first one.

share|improve this answer

Use

 bool AreEqual(int v1, ...);

You will need, however, to detect the end of the list of integers somehow. If there's a particular integer value that is not legal to pass to the function, then use that. For example, if all integers are positive, you can use -1 to mark the end. Otherwise, you can make the first parameter a count.

Here's the count version:

bool AreEqual(int count, int v1, ...)
{
     va_list vl;
     va_start(vl, count);
     for(int i = 1; i < count; ++i)
        if (va_arg(v1, int) != v1)
        {
            va_end(vl);
            return false;
        }
     va_end(vl);
     return true;
}

And here's the end marker version:

bool AreEqual(int v1, ...)
{
     va_list vl;
     va_start(vl, count);

     do
     {
         int param = va_arg(vl, int);
         if (param == -1)
         {
             va_end(vl);
             return true;
        }
    } while (param == v1);
    va_end(vl);
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This solution is not workable, because the caller must pass an argument to specify the number of the arguments. –  xmllmx Jan 29 '13 at 20:57
    
@xmllmx: That's one option. The other option is to use a marker at the end of the list. –  David Schwartz Jan 29 '13 at 21:08
1  
Forcing the caller to append a marker changes the function interface. –  xmllmx Jan 29 '13 at 21:12
1  
I agree. But since you didn't have an implementation (otherwise, why ask the question?) no code relies on the interface. So it's easily changeable. –  David Schwartz Jan 29 '13 at 21:14
2  
I have had an implementation, that is, the overloading solution. But I feel it is not elegant, so I asked this question. –  xmllmx Jan 29 '13 at 21:17

The varadic template requires recursion on specialization:

template<class A> //just two: this is trivial
bool are_equal(const A& a, const A& b)
{ return a==b; } 

template<class A, class... Others>
bool are_equal(const A& a, const A& b, const Others&... others)
{ return are_equal(a,b) && are_equal(b,others...); }

In essence every time are_equal is nested, others... will short by one until estinguish, and the function will bind the two args.

Note: By using A as a type for both a and b, and because Others's first has always to match an A, this in-fact- makes are_equal(...) to accept all arguments only of a same type (ot at least, convertible into the type of the first argument).

Although I fond this constrain generally useful, the limitation can be relaxed by using A and B as types for a and b This makes the function to work with every set of types for which an operator== exist for each of its pairs.

template<class A, class B> //just two: this is trivial
bool are_equal(const A& a, const B& b)
{ return a==b; } 

template<class A, class B, class... Others>
bool are_equal(const A& a, const B& b, const Others&... others)
{ return are_equal(a,b) && are_equal(b,others...); }
share|improve this answer
    
I think this solution is the best. Concise, elegant and beautiful! This answer should receive more upvotes. –  xmllmx Jan 29 '13 at 21:20

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