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How to validate day/month/year select with php? I red some topics about who to validate select with 2-3 or even 5-6 select options. I would know how to validate that kind of select. But in the case of, for exemple, month, there are 32 options. Or in the case of year option, the are 60-70 options. So im interested in whats the optimal way to do select validation when you have so much options?

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You're talking about a <select> with loads of <option>s right? –  Tom Walters Jan 29 '13 at 20:47
    
What have you already tried? And where exactly do you see the difference in validating input with 6 or with 60 different options? –  helmbert Jan 29 '13 at 20:47
    
What have you tried? Can you post your HTML? –  hek2mgl Jan 29 '13 at 20:47
    
Yes, Tom Walters. –  Kreator Jan 29 '13 at 20:48
    
when i use validation for 3-5-7 selct options i usualy use: if(!empty($gender) && $gender != "Male" && $gender != "Female"){ $error[] = "Gender not valid"; } –  Kreator Jan 29 '13 at 20:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Validating selects is fairly trivial.

Year

Let's say you have a sequential range of years from 1960-2013.

Your HTML for the selects is:

<select name="year">
    <option value="1960">1960</option>
    ...
    <option value="2013">2013</option>
</select>

So, you know that your year has to fall in the range of 1960 to 2013:

$year = (int) $_POST["year"]);

if ($year < 1960 || $year > 2013) {
    $validationPassed = false;
}

Simple enough to validate the year.

Month

Now that you know what year it is, you can find out if it is a leap year. However, that is only important for a single month, so first let's validate what month they selected:

<select name="month">
    <option value="0">January</option>
    ...
    <option value="11">December</option>
</select>

Once again, validation of the month is easy. We know it has to be a value between 0 and 11.

$month = (int) $_POST["month"];

if ($month < 0 || $month > 11) {
    $validationPassed = false;
}

Day

Now we know the month and the year. to validate the selected day, we need to check the following criteria:

  1. Is it a leap year?
  2. Is it the month of the year with the extra day for the leap year? (February).

For a year to be a leap year, it has to be divisible by 400, or not divisible by 100 and divisible by 4:

function isLeapYear($year) {
    if ($year % 400 == 0)
        return true;
    else if ($year % 100 == 0)
        return false;
    else if ($year % 4 == 0)
        return true;

    return false;
}

Now, we can check if it is a leap year or not. If it is a leap year, then we know we need to allow 1 extra day in February.

We make an array of days in each month:

$daysInMonth = array(31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31);

Then we get the amount of days in the current month:

$monthDays = $daysInMonth[$month];

If it is a leap year, we add a day to the total days in the month:

if ($month == 1 && isLeapYear($year)) //February
    $monthDays++;

Finally, we can validate the day

$day = (int) $_POST["day"];

if ($day < 0 || $day > $monthDays) {
    $validationPassed = false;
}

Now, all of this is basically encapsulated into the checkdate() function that was in the other answer below. So, to use checkdate() instead of all the code above, you could simply do the following:

HTML (Note: checkdate() is not zero-based, so we start our days and months at 1 instead of 0.)

<form action="myphp.php" method="post">
    <select name="day">
        <option value="1">1</option>
        ...
        <option value="31">31</option>
    </select>

    <select name="month">
        <option value="1">1</option>
        ...
        <option value="12">12</option>
    </select>

    <select name="year">
        <option value="1960">1960</option>
        ...
        <option value="2013">2013</option>
    </select>
</form>

PHP

$day = (int) $_POST["day"];
$month = (int) $_POST["month"];
$year = (int) $_POST["year"];

$validationPassed = checkdate($month, $day, $year);
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oh man its so simple. almost basics. that realy helps. thank you very much –  Kreator Jan 29 '13 at 21:12
    
It's an underusage of checkdate() –  zerkms Jan 29 '13 at 21:19
    
checkdate() is actually built to do exactly what I've outlined here. I've basically exposed how checkdate() functions internally. –  crush Jan 29 '13 at 21:21
    
@crush: "I've basically exposed how" - for what? ;-) –  zerkms Jan 29 '13 at 21:29
    
So he understands how it works. It's always better to know how things work than just to depend on them to work. Maybe he decides he wants to throw an extra wheel into the validation that isn't covered by checkdate. –  crush Jan 29 '13 at 21:29

For date it's actually relatively easy - you just use checkdate().

And for the other cases you could check if the value is within an expected range like:

if ($val >= min && $val <= max)

or, in case you have all the values in an array

if (in_array($val, $array_of_valid_values))
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good answer! Thanks for checkdate() –  hek2mgl Jan 29 '13 at 20:52
    
can you give me some more detailes about the second code cos im newb in this? –  Kreator Jan 29 '13 at 20:56
1  
@Kreator: php.net/in_array - check the documentation for every function you don't know before you ask. Nothing wrong in being newbie, but it's not a justification to not checking the manual first –  zerkms Jan 29 '13 at 20:56
    
@zerkms, do you understand that when your new in something you dont know where to look for answer? You can go to php.net and just watch, maybe this can help maybe that will do. Kapish? –  Kreator Jan 29 '13 at 20:59
    
@Kreator: http://php.net/functionname - now you know –  zerkms Jan 29 '13 at 21:04

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