Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Are there are any character encodings in which the 0 byte does not encode null, but encodes a more concatable character? My PHP gives me this list of encodings:

    [0] => pass
    [1] => auto
    [2] => wchar
    [3] => byte2be
    [4] => byte2le
    [5] => byte4be
    [6] => byte4le
    [7] => BASE64
    [8] => UUENCODE
    [9] => HTML-ENTITIES
    [10] => Quoted-Printable
    [11] => 7bit
    [12] => 8bit
    [13] => UCS-4
    [14] => UCS-4BE
    [15] => UCS-4LE
    [16] => UCS-2
    [17] => UCS-2BE
    [18] => UCS-2LE
    [19] => UTF-32
    [20] => UTF-32BE
    [21] => UTF-32LE
    [22] => UTF-16
    [23] => UTF-16BE
    [24] => UTF-16LE
    [25] => UTF-8
    [26] => UTF-7
    [27] => UTF7-IMAP
    [28] => ASCII
    [29] => EUC-JP
    [30] => SJIS
    [31] => eucJP-win
    [32] => SJIS-win
    [33] => CP932
    [34] => CP51932
    [35] => JIS
    [36] => ISO-2022-JP
    [37] => ISO-2022-JP-MS
    [38] => Windows-1252
    [39] => Windows-1254
    [40] => ISO-8859-1
    [41] => ISO-8859-2
    [42] => ISO-8859-3
    [43] => ISO-8859-4
    [44] => ISO-8859-5
    [45] => ISO-8859-6
    [46] => ISO-8859-7
    [47] => ISO-8859-8
    [48] => ISO-8859-9
    [49] => ISO-8859-10
    [50] => ISO-8859-13
    [51] => ISO-8859-14
    [52] => ISO-8859-15
    [53] => ISO-8859-16
    [54] => EUC-CN
    [55] => CP936
    [56] => HZ
    [57] => EUC-TW
    [58] => BIG-5
    [59] => EUC-KR
    [60] => UHC
    [61] => ISO-2022-KR
    [62] => Windows-1251
    [63] => CP866
    [64] => KOI8-R
    [65] => KOI8-U
    [66] => ArmSCII-8
    [67] => CP850
    [68] => JIS-ms
    [69] => CP50220
    [70] => CP50220raw
    [71] => CP50221
    [72] => CP50222
share|improve this question
    
Don't all the encodings have the first 127 characters the same? – zerkms Jan 29 '13 at 20:50
    
Not at all. Famously EBCDIC differs, and HTML entities for example encode ampersand as &. The question as I understand it is about the byte representation, not the represented code points, so any fixed-length multibyte encoding will represent single bytes with multiple bytes. – tripleee Jan 29 '13 at 21:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Any straightforward multibyte encoding (e.g. UTF-16 in all forms) will represent each code point as two bytes, one of which is zero. So for example U+0020 would be represented as 0x00 0x20 (big endian) or 0x20 0x00 (little endian). Similarly any character which is an even product of 256 will have a LSB of 0x00.

share|improve this answer
    
not quite; those characters whose code point is > 0xFF are encoded with two non-zero bytes (unless the codepoint is evenly divisible by 0xFF) – Todd Freed Feb 18 '14 at 20:42

Classically, in C a zero-byte is used to mark the end of a string. In PHP, a string can actually contain zero-bytes, but as far as I know there is no character encoding that encodes a zerobyte as a printable character.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.