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My exception mapper classes work perfectly when it's located inside the .war package. The problem is that I have several .war packages which share the same exception hierarchy. I'm thinking to put my exception mapper classes into a utility jar and put them into "/lib" folder of the application server. This utility jar already contains classes of my custom exceptions. It turns out that Jersey can't find my exception mapper classes once they are putted outside of .war package.

Is there a way to enable Jersey scanning providers located in "/lib" folder?

BTW, my application server is "JBoss AS 6.0" and I'm using Jersey SpringServlet. Here is my web.xml configuration snippet:

    <servlet>
    <servlet-name>Jersey Web Application</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>com.sun.jersey.spi.spring.container.servlet.SpringServlet</servlet-class>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>com.sun.jersey.config.property.packages</param-name>
        <param-value>
            com.sample.rest
        </param-value>
    </init-param>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>com.sun.jersey.api.json.POJOMappingFeature</param-name>
        <param-value>true</param-value>
    </init-param>
    <load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>Jersey Web Application</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>       
</servlet-mapping>

Cheers!

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How are you scanning the resources? What deployment approach you use in your web.xml? –  Arul Dhesiaseelan Jan 29 '13 at 22:23
    
web.xml is added according to comments –  James Gan Jan 30 '13 at 3:32
    
Why aren't you bundling the utility JAR into your web app? –  Perception Jan 30 '13 at 3:54
    
Hi, @Perception Yes, good point! My colleague is working on this direction now. I'm just wondering if there is a way that we can tell Jersey to scan classes from parent class loader. –  James Gan Jan 30 '13 at 3:56
    
This might not fit your use case, but a potential option is to not have Jersey scan for classes, but be explicit. You could instead provide an Application class and explicitly declare your used classes. (I've run into troubles with package scanning working or not depending on which App server I deploy on (e.g. Tomcat was cool, but Websphere didn't work at all). –  Charlie Jan 30 '13 at 4:42

1 Answer 1

You need to tell jersey to scan the packages which include your ExceptionHandler in your web.xml. Just separate them by a ';'

It should look something like this:

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>Jersey Web Application</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer</servlet-class>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>com.sun.jersey.config.property.packages</param-name>
        <param-value>com.company.app.rest;com.company.util.exception</param-value>
    </init-param>
    <load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
</servlet>
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