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I'm binding an XML file to a repeater, each item in a textbox. When the Save action is triggered, I need to write the changes back to the XML file. My question is what's the most efficient way of doing this, bearing in mind that the XML file is very small.

I can think of three, and I don't know which is best:

  1. Loop the repeater, find the matching ID in the XML file, update those nodes
  2. Loop the XML file, find the matching ID in the repeater, update those nodes
  3. Write a new XML file (replace the old one)

Thanks!

Updated with sample of what my XML file looks like:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Link>
<LinkNode>
<Section>New York</Section>
<Header>New York</Header>
<Item>IT/ Phone Support</Item>
<Details>Ext 5.8115</Details>
<ID>0</ID>
<HyperLink>0</HyperLink>
</LinkNode>
<LinkNode>
<Section>New York</Section>
<Header />
<Item>Email</Item>
<Details>info@gld.com</Details>
<ID>1</ID>
<HyperLink>2</HyperLink>
</LinkNode>
</Link>

And here's my class:

public class Link
{
    public String Section { get; set; }
    public String Header { get; set; }
    public String Item { get; set; }
    public String Details { get; set; }
    public Int32 ID { get; set; }
    public Int32 Hyperlink { get; set; }
}

My Links constructor:

 var LinksList = new List<Links>();
 var query = links_xml.Root.Descendants("LinkNode").Select(d => d);

            foreach (var q in query)
            {



                var linklist = new Links((!string.IsNullOrEmpty(q.Element("Header").Value)) ? q.Element("Header").Value : "",
                    (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(q.Element("Item").Value)) ? q.Element("Item").Value : "",
                    (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(q.Element("Details").Value)) ? q.Element("Details").Value : "",
                    (int)q.Element("ID"), (int)q.Element("HyperLink"));
                LinksList.Add(linklist);

            }
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can also create class objects that contain the properties you need. Put the reading and writing of the XML in a DAL layer. That way your DAL passes and receives a List<Url> of these objects and you abstract the data access (XML, in your case) from the rest of the application.

If you ever choose to change the data storage method (to SQL, etc), you would only need to change your DAL method and the rest of your code is unaffected.

Let me know if you want some code to illustrate.

EDIT: (some code)

Assuming that your elements has the following properties, this would be your class:

public class Url
{
     public int Id {get; set;}
     public string DisplayName {get; set;}
     public string Url {get; set;}
}

Then your DAL class would look like this:

/// <summary>
/// Handles data access for Url entities
/// </summary>
public static class UrlDAL
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The path where the file resides
    /// </summary>
    const string __FilePath = @"~\App_Data\";
    /// <summary>
    /// The name of the file
    /// </summary>
    const string __FileName = "UrlList.xml";
    /// <summary>
    /// The name of the temporary file. Used to keep a copy of the file if saving the new file fails.
    /// </summary>
    const string __FileNameTemp = "UrlList_TEMP.xml";

    /// <summary>
    /// Retrieves a list of url entity objects
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    internal static List<Url> Retrieve()
    {
        List<Url> urls = null;

        try
        {
            //read xml file
            XDocument data  = XDocument.Load(HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath(Path.Combine(UrlDAL.__FilePath, UrlDAL..__FileName)));
            //convert to list
            urls = Xml.DeserializeCollection<Url>(data);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            //perform logging / error handling
        }

        return urls;

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Saves the list of Url entities 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="urls">The list of url objects to save</param>
    internal static void Create(List<Url> urls)
    {

        try
        {
            //convert list into xml document
            XDocument file = Xml.SerializeCollection<Url>(urls);
            //rename the old file so you have a copy of it if saving the new file fails
            File.Copy(Path.Combine(UrlDAL.__FilePath, UrlDAL.__FileName), Path.Combine(UrlDAL.__FilePath, UrlDAL.__FileNameTemp));
            //saving the new file will overwrite the existing file
            file.Save(UrlDAL.__FilePath);
            //delete the old file
            File.Delete(Path.Combine(UrlDAL.__FilePath, UrlDAL.__FileNameTemp));
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            //perform logging / error handling
            //you should also alert yourself of this error so you can manually restore the old file
        }

    }

}

These are the extension methods used for XML serializing/deserializing:

public static class Xml
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Converts an XDoc into a List<T> of entities
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Any serializable object</typeparam>
    /// <param name="doc"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static List<T> DeserializeCollection<T>(XDocument doc)
    {
        if (doc == null)
            return null;

        try
        {
            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(List<T>));
            XmlReader reader = doc.CreateReader();
            List<T> result = (List<T>)serializer.Deserialize(reader);
            reader.Close();
            return result;
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            //perform logging / error handling
            return null;
        }

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Converts a List<T> of entities into an XDoc.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Any serializable object</typeparam>
    /// <param name="paramList"></param>
    public static XDocument SerializeCollection<T>(List<T> paramList)
    {
        if (paramList == null)
            return null;

        XDocument doc = new XDocument();

        try
        {
            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(paramList.GetType());
            XmlWriter writer = doc.CreateWriter();
            serializer.Serialize(writer, paramList);
            writer.Close();
            return doc;
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            //perform logging / error handling
            return null;
        }

    }
}

Don't forget to add references to the following namespaces:

using System.IO;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Linq;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

All that being said, you would call the DAL like so:

//to retrieve the list of urls
List<Url> urls = UrlDAL.Retrieve();
//to save the new list of urls to an xml file
List<Url> urls = [BUILD URL ENTITIES FROM REPEATER];
UrlDAL.Create(urls)

EDIT: Tips for creating XML

To avoid any problems deserializing the XML (XML can be very finicky about what it will parse), I tend to create some (or all) the classes I want to work with in code and run the List through the Xml.Serialize method. I then use the xml that is created there as my starting point for creating my XML file.

EDIT Create instances from repeater

As you loop over each item in the repeater, you can use the object initializer of .NET like so:

List<Links> links = new List<Links>();
foreach (RepeaterItem item in rptLinks.Items)
{
   //find all your controls and their values
   string details = ((TextBox)e.Item.Findcontrol("txtDetails")).Text;
   //do this for each control

   //use object initialization here
   links.Add(new Link {Details = details, [PROPERTY NAME] = [REPEATER ITEM VALUE], etc});
}

A good explanation of this feature can be found on MSDN here: Object and Collection Initializers (C# Programming Guide)

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Shai! Yes please, a code sample would be great. – user948060 Jan 29 '13 at 23:58
    
@user948060: I added code samples – Shai Cohen Jan 30 '13 at 0:58
    
thanks for the sample. I'm trying to implement it, but I'm getting the following error in DeserializeCollection at line List<T> result = (List<T>)serializer.Deserialize(reader);: {System.InvalidOperationException: There is an error in XML document (0, 0). ---> System.InvalidOperationException: <Links xmlns=''> was not expected. – user948060 Jan 30 '13 at 1:43
    
I updated my original question with what my XML file looks like, as well as my class. Perhaps I've got something wrong? – user948060 Jan 30 '13 at 2:48
    
XML can be very finicky about what it will parse. The root node of your XML should look like this <ArrayOfLinkNode>. To avoid these kind of problems, I suggest following the tip I added to my answer: "Tips for creating XML". Let me know if you run into any more issues. – Shai Cohen Jan 30 '13 at 18:56

Use XmlDocument to load the xml and then navigate through it to find the element that contains the value you want to change.

System.Xml.XmlDocument xmlDocument = new System.Xml.XmlDocument();
xmlDocument.Load(<filename or stream>);

Now, choose the most suitable method for you to find the elements or
attributes you want to change:

// For example:
XmlNodeList elemList = xmlDocument .GetElementsByTagName("Machine");
for (int i=0; i < elemList.Count; i++)
{
elemList[i].InnerXml = "Whateveryouwant";
}

Then, call the Save method to save the changes.

xmlDocument.Save(...);

share|improve this answer
    
What if I want to save all the elements? Is this still the recommended way? – user948060 Jan 29 '13 at 22:52

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