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I have a output which is not very well formatted and that causes the trouble in capturing variable value.

For example:

This is counter1 1000
this counter2 2000
this counter3 is higher value 3000

Now from above file I want to just capture 1000, 2000 and 3000. If I use awk with print $x where x = any value then it allocates the different values for each line. If I use $4 then for first line I will be able to select 1000 but for 2nd line it will not provide any value and for third line it will print higher so I want to insert the field separator and read the variable. Any help is greatly appreciated!

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Which version of sed are you using? Which OS? –  F. Hauri Jan 29 '13 at 22:56
    
I am running MAC OS 10.8.2 –  devnp Jan 29 '13 at 23:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you only want last argument, and only if a number:

echo $'For example:\nThis is counter1 1000\nthis counter2 2000\n
     this counter3 is higher value 3000\ndone.\n' |
  sed -ne 's/^.* \([0-9]\{1,99\}\)/\1/p'

1000
2000
3000

You could even trap the counter's number (and so read only line containing counterX):

echo $'For example:\nThis is counter1 1000\nthis counter2 2000\n
     this counter3 is higher value 3000\ndone.\n' |
  sed -ne 's/^.*\(counter[0-9]\{1,99\}\) \(.* \)\{0,1\}\([0-9]\{1,99\}\)$/\1 \3/p'

counter1 1000
counter2 2000
counter3 3000

Or even for just locating separator:

echo $'For example:\nThis is counter1 1000\nthis counter2 2000\n
     this counter3 is higher value 3000\ndone.\n' |
  sed -ne 's/^\(.*counter[0-9]\{1,99\}.*\) \([0-9]\{1,99\}\)$/\1 :: \2/p'
This is counter1 :: 1000
this counter2 :: 2000
this counter3 is higher value :: 3000

or, or...

echo $'For example:\nThis is counter1 1000\nthis counter2 2000\n
     this counter3 is higher value 3000\ndone.\n' |
  sed -e 's/^\(.*counter[0-9]\{1,99\}.*\) \([0-9]\{1,99\}\)$/\1 :: \2/'

For example:
This is counter1 :: 1000
this counter2 :: 2000
this counter3 is higher value :: 3000
done.
share|improve this answer
    
I tired sed -ne 's/^.* ([0-9]\+)/\1/p' filename but that didnt work. i need to keep the description as well in output. If we can put the separator before the last value of digits then we can use $1 before separator and $2 after separator which will collect counter value. –  devnp Jan 29 '13 at 22:48
    
Ok try this new version, could work on Mac-OS's sed too. –  F. Hauri Jan 29 '13 at 22:59
    
Thanks for help! –  devnp Jan 29 '13 at 23:32

If the number is always the last field, you can do

{ print $NF }
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This is of course an awk command. –  that other guy Jan 29 '13 at 22:47

To print the last word, use

awk '{ print $NF }'

To separate words that are numbers, you can use

cat yourfile | tr ' ' '\n' | egrep '^[0-9]+$'

or the GNU specific grep -ow '[0-9]*' yourfile

To find only the first word that is a number on the line, you can use

awk '{ for(i=0; i<=NF; i++) if($i ~ /^[0-9]+$/) { print $i; break; } }'
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The onliner you provided works fine if I have only "this is counter1 1000" but if I have "this is counter2 2000 1000" then it prints 2000 and 1000 both one after another, I want to get only 1000. –  devnp Jan 29 '13 at 22:52
    
I updated the answer to find the first number on the line. Any more additional requirements? –  that other guy Jan 29 '13 at 22:58
    
Thank you very much for help. –  devnp Jan 29 '13 at 23:33

To print only the last element with sed, use something like this:

sed 's/.* //'

Test input:

cat << EOF > infile
This is counter1 1000
this counter2 2000
this counter3 is higher value 3000
EOF

Run test:

<infile sed 's/.* //'

Output:

1000
2000
3000
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Other way using sed

sed -re 's/(.*)\s([0-9]+)/\2/' temp.txt

Output

1000
2000
3000
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as other suggested you can use $NF in awk. you can also use perl if at all the numbers are the last field always:

perl -F -lane 'print $F[scalar(@F)-1]' your_file

or in case its not always the last field, then:

perl -F -lane 'for(@F){print if(/^\d+$/)}' your_file
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