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I have a simple rotating element on a web page composed of nested divs, inside an ASP.NET UserControl. Works fine when only one control is present. However, multiple instances of the control are interfering with each other. The script is registered in code-behind, not being included twice. Here is the jQuery code:

    $(document).ready(function () {
    var timer = null;

    $("div.divRotator").find("div:first-child").show();

    //Wait 5 seconds then call rotate();
    timer = setTimeout(rotate, 4000);

    function rotate() {
        var nextDiv = $("div.divRotator").find("div:visible").next("div");
        if (nextDiv.html() == null) {  //PROBLEM HERE!!!
            nextDiv = $("div.divRotator").find("div:first-child");
            //console.log("rotating...");
        }
        $("div.divRotator").find("div:visible").fadeOut(500, function () { nextDiv.show(); });

        timer = setTimeout(rotate, 4000);
    }
});

This code will work fine if all the control have the same number of elements... but when they don't, things go wonky. The check to see if we should restart out rotation doesn't work, because nextDiv is actually composed of multiple elements now that there are multiple instances of the UserControl on the page.

What's the best strategy here? Modify the div classes/IDs in code-behind and give each control separate javascript? That seems tedious and should be unnecessary. It seems like it would be much better to somehow modify the way nextDiv works, but my jQuery knowledge is failing me here... surely there is a simple solution to this?

FYI,here's what my rendered content looks like:

<div class="divRotator">
    <div style="display:none"> Some content </div>
    <div style="display:none"> Some more content </div>
    <div style="display:none"> you guessed it </div>
</div>

<div class="divRotator">
    <div style="display:none"> Uh oh, now we got trouble <div>
</div>
share|improve this question

You're not closing your div tags for a start. http://jsfiddle.net/ryansmith94/5NwbH/

<div class="divRotator">
    <div style="display:none"> Some content </div>
    <div style="display:none"> Some more content </div>
    <div style="display:none"> you guessed it </div>
</div>

<div class="divRotator">
    <div style="display:none"> Uh oh, now we got trouble </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thanks. Clearly that's not the problem though, just a typo. – Bryan Jan 29 '13 at 23:54
    
It's working as I would expect it to from looking at your JavaScript. In terms of answering your question, you could load the elements into an array and do it that way. – Ryan Smith Jan 29 '13 at 23:57
    
Alternatively you check each element in nextDiv. My problem with your current method is that you keep calling jquery to find the div and there is no apparent need unless your content changes dynamically. – Ryan Smith Jan 30 '13 at 0:05
    
Wasn't quite right the first time... I wanted the individual sub divs in each rotator to cycle to the first element after displaying the last one. See my updated code on jsfiddle. The two divRotator items cycle independently – Bryan Jan 30 '13 at 0:07
    
I see what you mean... like calling $("div.divRotator") several times instead of just storing it? – Bryan Jan 30 '13 at 0:08

perhaps wrap your "divRotator" div's in a parent div that get's a unique id from your user control could do the trick.

Something like :

<div id="divParent" runat="server">
 <div class="divRotator">
    <div style="display:none"> Some content <div>
    <div style="display:none"> Some more content <div>
    <div style="display:none"> you guessed it <div>
 </div>

  <div class="divRotator">
    <div style="display:none"> Uh oh, now we got trouble <div>
  </div>
</div>

/// Javascript

    $(document).ready(function () {
    var timer = null;
    var divParent = $('#<%= divParent.ClientID  %>');
    var divrotator = divParent.find("div.divRotator");



    divrotator.find("div:first-child").show();

    //Wait 5 seconds then call rotate();
    timer = setTimeout(rotate, 4000);

    function rotate() {
        var nextDiv = divrotator.find("div:visible").next("div");
        if (nextDiv.html() == null) {  //PROBLEM HERE!!!
            nextDiv =divrotator.find("div:first-child");
            //console.log("rotating...");
        }
        divrotator.find("div:visible").fadeOut(500, function () { nextDiv.show(); });

        timer = setTimeout(rotate, 4000);
    }
});

Note: Not tested. you may have to do some adjustments

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK as usual, posted the question to StackOverflow (after a couple of hours of frustration) and then the answer came to me. I was forgetting about the $(selector).each() function.

Modified rotate() to update nextDiv for each individual divRotator:

    function rotate() {
        $('div.divRotator').each(function (index, value) {    //IMPORTANT BIT
            var nextDiv = $(this).find('div:visible').next('div');
            if (nextDiv.html() == null) {
                nextDiv = $(this).find('div:first-child');
            }

            $(this).find('div:visible').fadeOut(500, function () { nextDiv.show(); });
        });

        timer = setTimeout(rotate, 4000);
    }

Now we have individual "nextDiv" elements to work with and update.

Thanks for suggestions and link to jsfiddle.

share|improve this answer

if you're using userControls you should protect the code from outside interference using something like module patterns

e.g.
        var specificUserControlName = {};

        (function () {
            specificUserControlName.AnimationJs = function () {

                var _rotate= function () {
             var nextDiv = $("div.divRotator").find("div:visible").next("div");
              if (nextDiv.html() == null) {  //PROBLEM HERE!!!
                  nextDiv = $("div.divRotator").find("div:first-child");
                  //console.log("rotating...");
               }
               $("div.divRotator").find("div:visible").fadeOut(500, function () { nextDiv.show(); });

              timer = setTimeout(rotate, 4000);
                };


                return { // publicly accessible API

                    rotate: function () {
                        _rotate();
                    }

                };

            };

        })();

        var uniqueUserControlShortName= new specificUserControlName.AnimationJs();

then function can be called by uniqueUserControlShortName.rotate() to qualify the right version

share|improve this answer

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