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I'm trying to bind functions to items in a node list in Internet Explorer 7.

for(var j = 0; j < navLabels.length; j++)
{
    navInsets[j].onmouseover = function(){showLabel(navLabels[j], true);};
    navInsets[j].onmouseout = function(){showLabel(navLabels[j], false);};
    navInsets[j].onclick = function(){selectNew(j);};
    navLabels[j].onclick = function(){selectNew(j);};
}

showLabel() and selectNew() are each my own functions. They each need to be passed an index which, in this case, is j.

I know that, inside the anonymous functions, j will end up being a reference to j, not the value of j. I also know that I could use the addEventListener or the bind methods to do this, but neither is allowed in IE 7. I even know that the attachEvent method would work for ie7, but since I need to pass arguments, I would need to wrap the functions in an anonymous function to use attachEvent (at least that's what appears to be true), which is the original problem.

Any not-too-hacky thoughts on the subject? Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't necessarily need to use an IIFE for each bound event. You can use the same captured j in all event bindings:

for(var j = 0; j < navLabels.length; j++) {
    (function(j) {
        navInsets[j].onmouseover = function(){showLabel(navLabels[j], true);};
        navInsets[j].onmouseout = function(){showLabel(navLabels[j], false);};
        navInsets[j].onclick = function(){selectNew(j);};
        navLabels[j].onclick = function(){selectNew(j);};
    })(j);
}

I don't think you can get any "cleaner" than that. You might be able to extract the anonymous function and make it a named function (in the same scope as navInsets and navLabels), but that could make it hard to see what the loop actually does (since you have to go lookup the one-use function). I don't see any obvious other solutions, since you will need a closure anyhow.

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Beautiful. I realize this is basically the same answer as Blender offered, but you were kind enough to give an answer that could be copied/pasted, so I'll mark this one as the answer. Thanks. –  dom Jan 29 '13 at 23:29
    
@dom Yes, our answers are pretty much equivalent. –  Mattias Buelens Jan 29 '13 at 23:31

Use an anonymous function to shadow j:

(function(j) {
    navInsets[j].onclick = function() {selectNew(j);};
    ...
})(j);

This will force j to be passed by value in the scope of your function.

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+1 for getting in first. Thanks. –  dom Jan 29 '13 at 23:30

Looking at your code, I think you can optimise your code a lot by making use of event-bubbling/delegating. If you're ready to invest some time, you can probably gain a lot by learning jQuery.

Without the HTML code of your site (and the exact workings of showLabel() and selectNew(), I cannot help you further, but usually, setting a click and mouse over handler on a navigation-list can be accomplished with something as simple as this;

 $('ul#nav').on('click', 'label', function(){
     selectNew(this);
 });
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Sorry for not specifying that I intend to avoid using jQuery if possible, but, yes, jquery offers several cross-browser options for this sort of thing. –  dom Jan 29 '13 at 23:32
    
Even without jQuery, it's possible to make use of event-bubbling/delegation. Attaching separate event handlers to every element is often bad for performance and leads to memory leaks, especially in older versions of Internet Explorer –  thaJeztah Jan 29 '13 at 23:36
1  
@dom here's a simple example without using a library v1.cherny.com/webdev/70/… and a very nice explanation davidwalsh.name/event-delegate –  thaJeztah Jan 29 '13 at 23:40

To be completely honest, in a case like this where all you need is an index, I would store it directly on the element.

for(var j = 0; j < navLabels.length; j++)
{
    navInsets[j].j = j;
    navInsets[j].onmouseover = function(){showLabel(navLabels[this.j], true);};
    navInsets[j].onmouseout = function(){showLabel(navLabels[this.j], false);};
    navInsets[j].onclick = function(){selectNew(this.j);};
    navLabels[j].onclick = function(){selectNew(this.j);};
}

It's a very light, clean and fast solution. Just don't store the element itself, since that could cause leaks.

But storing just an index is harmless, and it avoids the possibility of closure leaks.


Also, there may be a better "DOM traversal" solution, but that would depend on your markup.

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