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What is benefit of type declaration:

type xxx
and yyy

over

type xxx
type yyy

To give it semantic that one depends on another?

I'm using OcamlWin 4.0 and the code is from C:\OCaml\lib\hashtbl.ml

  type ('a, 'b) t =
  { mutable size: int;                        (* number of entries *)
    mutable data: ('a, 'b) bucketlist array;  (* the buckets *)
    mutable seed: int;                        (* for randomization *)
    initial_size: int;                        (* initial array size *)
  }

and ('a, 'b) bucketlist =
    Empty
  | Cons of 'a * 'b * ('a, 'b) bucketlist

it compiles. When I change the and to type

type ('a, 'b) t =
  { mutable size: int;                        (* number of entries *)
    mutable data: ('a, 'b) bucketlist array;  (* the buckets *)
    mutable seed: int;                        (* for randomization *)
    initial_size: int;                        (* initial array size *)
  }

type ('a, 'b) bucketlist =
    Empty
  | Cons of 'a * 'b * ('a, 'b) bucketlist

compiles as well.

share|improve this question
    
I'd be surprised if it really worked. What could be accepted by OCaml would be type bucketlist = ... ;; type t = ... since, as remarked by Andreas Rossberg bucketlist does not depend on t. type t = ... ;; type bucketlist = ... can only be accepted if there is already a bucketlist defined in the environment (e.g. if you evaluated the mutually recursive version in the interpreter and afterwards the non-recursive one in the same session). – Virgile Jan 30 '13 at 9:18

The and keyword is often used when defining mutually recursive declarations

Given your example

type ('a, 'b) t =
    { mutable size: int;                        (* number of entries *)
      mutable data: ('a, 'b) bucketlist array;  (* the buckets *)
      mutable seed: int;                        (* for randomization *)
      initial_size: int;                        (* initial array size *)
    }

type ('a, 'b) bucketlist =
    Empty
  | Cons of 'a * 'b * ('a, 'b) bucketlist

would give an Error: Unbound type constructor bucketlist on line 3, characters 20-39. However changing the second type with an and will remove the error.

type ('a, 'b) t =
    { mutable size: int;                        (* number of entries *)
      mutable data: ('a, 'b) bucketlist array;  (* the buckets *)
      mutable seed: int;                        (* for randomization *)
      initial_size: int;                        (* initial array size *)
    }

and ('a, 'b) bucketlist =
    Empty
  | Cons of 'a * 'b * ('a, 'b) bucketlist

I can't come up with a reason why it would compile for you in both cases, however if you were using the interpreter and you forget to close it down, then it will have old bindings in its environment.
That is, if you have first evaluated you code with the and keyword then you can keep re-evaluating the code without as bucketlist have already been defined in the invironment.

share|improve this answer
    
Hashtbl from standard library type ('a, 'b) t = ....mutable data: ('a, 'b) bucketlist array; ... and ('a, 'b) bucketlist = Empty | Cons of 'a * 'b * ('a, 'b) bucketlist just t depends on bucketlist – lukas Jan 29 '13 at 23:45
    
His example is from the OCaml standard library. – nlucaroni Jan 30 '13 at 2:18
    
@Jesper see my update. – lukas Jan 30 '13 at 2:18
    
@lukas, first of all, sorry that I totally missed that this was a ocaml question. I just saw the ml tag and made assumptions from that :). However I have update my answer – Jesper.Reenberg Jan 30 '13 at 14:05
    
@Jesper.Reenberg no need to apology. You are right. ocamlc doesn't compile. The answer is "It is used when one declaration depends on another (don't have to be mutually recursive). – lukas Jan 30 '13 at 19:09

The and keyword is needed to express mutually recursive definitions. For example,

type t = A | B of u
and  u = C | D of t

would no longer compile if you were to replace and with type. In your example, its use is redundant, though.

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