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Currently I use same convention for class names and method names. They have a leading capital letter without prefix. And I don't use "Get" prefix to get an attribute. However, I meet a name conflict problem in the following code

class Material
{};

class Background
{
public:
    Material* Material() const             {return m_material;}  // Name conflict
    void SetMaterial(Material* material)   {m_material = material;}

private:
    Material* m_material;
};

What is the easiest way to solve the problem but keeping or with minimum modification of my conventions? Thanks a lot!

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3  
Use upper case class names and camelCased members and method names. – Joe Jan 29 '13 at 23:25
2  
What's so bad with using a "Get" prefix anyway? – StoryTeller Jan 29 '13 at 23:26
up vote 5 down vote accepted

What is the easiest way to solve the problem but keeping or with minimum modification of my conventions?

The easiest way might be to slightly modify the convention, such as start method names with lowercase.

BTW, I like that you are not using the word "get" in the accessor method. In the same spirit, you may drop the word "set" in the mutator method (here, SetMaterial()). The signature would be sufficient to distinguish the accessor and mutator.

If you like them, you would reach at:

class Material
{};

class Background
{
public:
    Material* material() const          {return m_material;}
    void material(Material* material)   {m_material = material;}

private:
    Material* m_material;
};
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out of curiosity (I know it's ultimately personal preference): Why do you prefer dropping get/set? – stefan Jan 29 '13 at 23:32
4  
That's a good question, glad that you asked! To me, the "get" or "set" appear superfluous since the usage makes it clear and unambiguous whether the code is getting or setting. Also, I personally find if( bg.material() == foo ) easier and fluent to read, compared to if( bg.getMaterial() == foo ). – Arun Jan 29 '13 at 23:47

It is unusual to capitalise method names.

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1  
In C++ anyway... It's all too common in .NET languages. – Platinum Azure Jan 29 '13 at 23:25
    
The question was tagged C++... – Alex Chamberlain Jan 29 '13 at 23:27

Take a look at Qt library. It uses almost the same conventions as you and it is the best piece of code I've ever seen. Only difference I see is capital letter at begin of method names. So change yours convention to match theirs and you will be happy.

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You are bitten by not following good naming rules.

To name a function, use a strong verb followed by an object A procedure with functional cohesion usually performs an operation on an object. The name should reflect what the procedure does, and an operation on an object implies a verb-plus-object name. GetMaterial(), SetMaterial, PrintDocument(), CalcMonthlyRevenues(), CheckOrderlnfo(), and RepaginateDocument() are samples of good procedure names.

What is the easiest way to solve the problem but keeping or with minimum modification of my conventions?

Simply add an action in front of object as function name:

Material* GetMaterial() const {return m_material;}  
share|improve this answer
    
Explain the downvote? – billz Jan 30 '13 at 9:55

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