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I have little problem with axis change.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
from pylab import *

im = plt.imshow(np.flipud(plt.imread('tas.png')), origin='lower')

plt.show()

I had loaded the image and got axis for my image. For X(0-800)&for Y(0-600). I don't need such as scale all what i need it is a image as background for my plotting with coordinates which on another axis X(35 77) Y(0 16) But when i wrote

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
from pylab import *

im = plt.imshow(np.flipud(plt.imread('tas.png')), origin='lower')

plt.axis([35, 75, 0, 16]) 
plt.show()

I got only the small part of image. Could anyone help? I would be so grateful for some help.

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note that if you're importing pyplot and numpy, the pylab import is totally unnecessary and clutters/confuses your namespace –  Paul H Jan 30 '13 at 1:32
    
Can you post a link to the image somewhere? It's hard to help you without being able to run your code verbatim. –  Paul H Jan 30 '13 at 1:41
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You want the extent keyword:

im = plt.imshow(np.flipud(plt.imread('tas.png')), 
                origin='lower', 
                extent=[35, 75, 0, 16])

imshow documentation.

share|improve this answer
    
tcaswell, thank you again for your answers) extent helped with axis but image was changed. This is the link [IMG]i46.tinypic.com/6nseaa.png[/IMG] .And here is what i exactly need [IMG]i50.tinypic.com/6ghjjd.jpg[/IMG] –  Protoss Reed Jan 30 '13 at 15:50
    
@ProtossReed It looks like you just need to play around with the aspect ratio. imshow(..., aspect=3.2..) or what ever you need it to be to look right. –  tcaswell Jan 30 '13 at 19:58
    
you are genius!))Thanks a lot))aspect helped! –  Protoss Reed Jan 30 '13 at 20:09
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With the following code

fig = plt.figure()
extax = fig.add_axes([0,0,1,1])
extax.imshow(np.flipud(plt.imread('pnggrad16rgb.png')), origin='lower')

ax = fig.add_axes([0.2,0.2, 0.6, 0.6], axisbg='none')
ax.plot([1,2,3], [3,6,1], color='w')

I get this figure this figure.

You should than play with visibility of axis, ticklabels and ticks of extax to hide the all the unwanted things of the background image. Should be possible to add a axes with the underlying figure coordinates: give a look here. The gallery can also give some idea on what is possible and how to do it

The underlying image is taken from here

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Thank you for your help) –  Protoss Reed Feb 3 '13 at 16:48
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