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I'm trying to install a custom version of the composite_primary_keys gem using Bundler that has some changes we need, based off of the 2.2.2 version. Our version of the gem is 2.2.2.0 and is hosted on our internal gem server (this 4-digit versioning scheme only exists on our internal gem server). The app requirements are such that we are on jruby-1.6.7 (RUBY_VERSION = 1.8.7), RubyGems version (gem -v) 1.3.6, and the latest stable version of Bundler, 1.2.3.

Anyway, my Gemfile looks like this:

source 'http://rubygems.org'
source 'http://gems.internal'

gem 'composite_primary_keys', '2.2.2.0'
gem 'hoe',                    '1.8.3'

Executing bundle outputs this:

$ bundle
Fetching gem metadata from http://rubygems.org/........
Fetching gem metadata from http://gems.internal/...
Installing rake (10.0.3) 
Installing i18n (0.6.1) 
Installing multi_json (1.5.0) 
Installing activesupport (3.2.11) 
Installing builder (3.0.4) 
Installing activemodel (3.2.11) 
Installing arel (3.0.2) 
Installing tzinfo (0.3.35) 
Installing activerecord (3.2.11) 
Installing json_pure (1.7.6) 
Installing rubyforge (2.0.4) 
Installing hoe (1.8.3) 
Installing composite_primary_keys (2.2.2) 
Using bundler (1.2.3) 
Your bundle is complete! Use `bundle show [gemname]` to see where a bundled gem is installed.

As you can see, composite_primary_keys 2.2.2 actually gets installed, not 2.2.2.0. This is the Gemfile.lock that is generated:

GEM
  remote: http://rubygems.org/
  remote: http://gems.internal/
  specs:
    activemodel (3.2.11)
      activesupport (= 3.2.11)
      builder (~> 3.0.0)
    activerecord (3.2.11)
      activemodel (= 3.2.11)
      activesupport (= 3.2.11)
      arel (~> 3.0.2)
      tzinfo (~> 0.3.29)
    activesupport (3.2.11)
      i18n (~> 0.6)
      multi_json (~> 1.0)
    arel (3.0.2)
    builder (3.0.4)
    composite_primary_keys (2.2.2)
      activerecord (>= 2.2.0)
      hoe (>= 1.8.3)
    hoe (1.8.3)
      rake (>= 0.8.3)
      rubyforge (>= 1.0.2)
    i18n (0.6.1)
    json_pure (1.7.6)
    multi_json (1.5.0)
    rake (10.0.3)
    rubyforge (2.0.4)
      json_pure (>= 1.1.7)
    tzinfo (0.3.35)

PLATFORMS
  java

DEPENDENCIES
  composite_primary_keys (= 2.2.2.0)
  hoe (= 1.8.3)

Now, if I uninstall composite_primary_keys and install my version by hand:

$ gem uninstall composite_primary_keys
Successfully uninstalled composite_primary_keys-2.2.2
$ gem install composite_primary_keys -v 2.2.2.0
Successfully installed composite_primary_keys-2.2.2.0
1 gem installed
Installing ri documentation for composite_primary_keys-2.2.2.0...
Installing RDoc documentation for composite_primary_keys-2.2.2.0...

And then execute bundle:

$ bundle        
Using rake (10.0.3) 
Using i18n (0.6.1) 
Using multi_json (1.5.0) 
Using activesupport (3.2.11) 
Using builder (3.0.4) 
Using activemodel (3.2.11) 
Using arel (3.0.2) 
Using tzinfo (0.3.35) 
Using activerecord (3.2.11) 
Using composite_primary_keys (2.2.2.0) 
Using json_pure (1.7.6) 
Using rubyforge (2.0.4) 
Using hoe (1.8.3) 
Using bundler (1.2.3) 
Your bundle is complete! Use `bundle show [gemname]` to see where a bundled gem is installed.

It keeps my custom gem. Running bundle update at this point updates the Gemfile.lock:

$ bundle update composite_primary_keys
Fetching gem metadata from http://rubygems.org/........
Fetching gem metadata from http://gems.internal/...
Using rake (10.0.3) 
Using i18n (0.6.1) 
Using multi_json (1.5.0) 
Using activesupport (3.2.11) 
Using builder (3.0.4) 
Using activemodel (3.2.11) 
Using arel (3.0.2) 
Using tzinfo (0.3.35) 
Using activerecord (3.2.11) 
Using composite_primary_keys (2.2.2.0) 
Using json_pure (1.7.6) 
Using rubyforge (2.0.4) 
Using hoe (1.8.3) 
Using bundler (1.2.3) 
Your bundle is updated! Use `bundle show [gemname]` to see where a bundled gem is installed.

The Gemfile.lock now looks like this:

GEM
  remote: http://rubygems.org/
  remote: http://gems.internal/
  specs:
    activemodel (3.2.11)
      activesupport (= 3.2.11)
      builder (~> 3.0.0)
    activerecord (3.2.11)
      activemodel (= 3.2.11)
      activesupport (= 3.2.11)
      arel (~> 3.0.2)
      tzinfo (~> 0.3.29)
    activesupport (3.2.11)
      i18n (~> 0.6)
      multi_json (~> 1.0)
    arel (3.0.2)
    builder (3.0.4)
    composite_primary_keys (2.2.2.0)
      activerecord (>= 2.2.0)
    hoe (1.8.3)
      rake (>= 0.8.3)
      rubyforge (>= 1.0.2)
    i18n (0.6.1)
    json_pure (1.7.6)
    multi_json (1.5.0)
    rake (10.0.3)
    rubyforge (2.0.4)
      json_pure (>= 1.1.7)
    tzinfo (0.3.35)

PLATFORMS
  java

DEPENDENCIES
  composite_primary_keys (= 2.2.2.0)
  hoe (= 1.8.3)

My Guess

My suspicion is Bundler somehow relies on how RubyGems implements the <=> operator...

require 'rubygems'
Gem::Version.new('2.2.2') <=> Gem::Version.new('2.2.2.0') # => 0
Gem::Version.new('2.2.2') == Gem::Version.new('2.2.2.0') # => true

Can anyone confirm? Is this expected behavior? Would this be a good argument for avoiding minor version numbers of 0, in case the version number ever loses a digit? e.g.

Gem::Version.new('2') == Gem::Version.new('2.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0') # => true
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Although this doesn't directly answer your question. I faced a similar problem in the past and ended up making the custom gem an extension of the other gem. i.e. to patch functionality in "my-awesome-gem" you would call it "my-awesome-gem-custom" or something similar. Trust me, the route you're going down is fraught with dependency nightmares. :)

One note though is to pay attention to the differences in the require Custom Gem Naming for an extension gem, as they are slightly different. "require /x/y/z" versus "requre x_y_z". Doing it this way should allow you to use Ruby's open classes to layer or override the functionality as needed.

share|improve this answer
    
lol. just saw that it was you abe. haha –  engineerDave Jan 30 '13 at 0:34

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