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I am writing a small program that takes CSV files and updates them to the database. One of the files has a date-of-birth column, and the column is not always in the same format.

I have begun writing code to check the entire list to determine a format, since a single date can be ambiguous (e.g. '10/12/12', '10/12/2012', '12/10/2012', '2012/12/10' can all be the same date). I'm assuming that the format will be consistent for a given list.

This is the code I have so far,

private static string GetDateFormat(string[] date)
{
    DateTime result;
    CultureInfo ci = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture;
    string[] fmts = ci.DateTimeFormat.GetAllDateTimePatterns();
    bool error;
    date = date.Where(x => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x)).ToArray();
    foreach (string a in fmts)
    {
        error = false;
        for (int i = 0; i < date.Count(); i++)
        {
            if (!DateTime.TryParseExact(date[i], a, ci, DateTimeStyles.AssumeLocal, out result))
            {
                error = true;
            }

        }
        if (error == false)
        {
            return a;
        }            
    }
    throw new CsvToImsException("Error: Date Format is inconsistant or unrecognised");
}

But I can't get it to work with any of the sample dates I have, due to small issues in each list (one list has dates set as '4/5/2012' instead of '04/05/2012', another has '4/05/2012 0:00' etc).

This must be a common problem. Has anybody written any libraries that are broad enough for this application? I'm looking at splitting the dates by the '/' character for parsing, but is there an easier way?

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Irish Yobbo you could write you own custom Method that checks the format of the incoming string and return the date I can post an example as an Idea if you like –  MethodMan Jan 30 '13 at 0:12
    
I'm not entirely sure what you're asking. I can parse each date separately and get a format, but I need the format that is consistent with the entire list. For example, if the first item in the list is '10/12/2000' it may assume the format is dd/MM/yyyy, but if the next one is '10/23/2001', it can assume that it is MM/dd/yyyy, because both dates comply to that format. –  Irish Yobbo Jan 30 '13 at 0:18
    
I am suggesting that you either put the pre check in a Case statement based on the length of the date format for example it will be either a length of 8 dd/mm/yy a length of 9 m/dd/yyyy a length of 10 MM/dd/yyyy then based on that you can have a IFormatProvider I will post an example that works but you will need to make sure the date is in that particular format.. you could create a separate class that checks all combinations as well –  MethodMan Jan 30 '13 at 0:30
    
will the dates always have a 4 digit year.. this will make a difference on the example I am going to post for you in a few minutes –  MethodMan Jan 30 '13 at 0:37
    
All the example files I have do, so we'll say yes. –  Irish Yobbo Jan 30 '13 at 0:39

2 Answers 2

Here is something that can get you on the right track to something that you will need Please read the comments in the example code because you will only need to add 2 Conditional if statements if the dates come in with single month value and single day value

//of course you will not hard code the dates you will replace DateString with your 
//Date Variable you can also convert the code below into a method if you so 
string DateString = "04/05/2012";
var dateLength = DateString.Length;
IFormatProvider culture = new CultureInfo("en-US", true);
DateTime dateVal;
switch (dateLength)
{
     case 8:
        {
          dateVal = DateTime.ParseExact(DateString, "M/d/yyyy", culture);
            break;
        }
    case 9:
        {
            // he you can add your own additional if(){} condition to check if date value Day has a length of 2 
            // if so then you know that the date is in m/dd/yyyy format
            // otherwise you know it's in mm/d/yyyy but 
            dateVal = DateTime.ParseExact(DateString, "M/dd/yyyy", culture);
            break;
        }
    case 10:
        {
            dateVal = DateTime.ParseExact(DateString, "MM/dd/yyyy", culture);
            break;
        }

}
share|improve this answer
    
That looks like a good starting point, I'll just need to modify it to take a list instead of a single string. I'll see how that goes. –  Irish Yobbo Jan 30 '13 at 1:03
    
Irish Yobbo, that sounds good like I said for the greater majority of your dates this should work for you all you need to do is add conditional checks for some of the odd DateTime formats that you are seeing.. I am glad that I could provide you with a good working example to start from. –  MethodMan Jan 30 '13 at 9:38

I ended up using a method similar to my original one, with some additions from DJ KRAZE's code. This works for all but the really weird ones like 4/05/2012 0:00, but even that can be fixed by adding a special case along the lines of fmts.Add("d/MM/yyyy h:mm").

//Parse DOB to check format
string[] dateList = new string[PersonList.Count()];
for (int i = 0; i < PersonList.Count(); i++)
{
    PersonList[i].DOB = PersonList[i].DOB.Replace('-', '/').Replace('.', '/').Trim();
    dateList[i] = PersonList[i].DOB;
}
string dateFormat = GetDateFormat(dateList);


private static string GetDateFormat(string[] date)
{
    DateTime result;
    CultureInfo ci = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture;
    List<string> fmts = ci.DateTimeFormat.GetAllDateTimePatterns().ToList();
    fmts.Add("yyyy/MM/d");
    fmts.Add("d/MM/yyyy");
    bool error;
    date = date.Where(x => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x)).ToArray();
    foreach (string a in fmts)
    {
        error = false;
        for (int i = 0; i < date.Count(); i++)
        {
            if (!DateTime.TryParseExact(date[i], a, ci, DateTimeStyles.AssumeLocal, out result))
            {
                error = true;
            }
        }
        if (error == false)
        {
            return a;
        }          
    }
    throw new CsvToImsException("Error: Date Format is inconsistant or unrecognised");
}

I can then use the date format in a for loop to parse every date in the list:

IFormatProvider culture = new CultureInfo("en-US", true);
BirthDate birthDate = DateTime.ParseExact(person.DOB, dateFormat, culture);
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