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Is it possible to generate the original XSD from an XML document?

If an XML document did not use some optional data elements of the original schema, wouldn't any generated XSD be different from the original XSD?

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2 Answers 2

No, it's not possible. For any given XML document, there's an infinite number of schemas that it conforms to, and none of them has any special claim over the others to be "original".

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Would it actually be infinite? –  CJ7 Jan 30 '13 at 10:08
    
If Michael Kay says so, then I definitely believe him! –  Bill Michell Jan 30 '13 at 15:14
    
Yes, of course it's infinite. Just keep adding optional element declarations that aren't required and aren't used in your instance. Now, we could argue about whether there is some set of "minimal" schemas that the instance conforms to, where "minimal" means "no unused definitions", and the question starts to get more interesting. –  Michael Kay Jan 30 '13 at 16:16

It is impossible to be certain that the generated XSD will be identical to the original, partly for the reason you mention (that is, unused optional elements).

In fact, most restrictions will be difficult for the automatic process to correctly infer. And of course maxOccurs could in theory be any value greater than or equal to the maximum observed value in the file.

The best you can hope for is an XSD for which the original XML is a valid file, and which can be manually adjusted to accept a wider range of valid inputs, I think.

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Bill is correct. For instance, how would you know for sure that "123" is meant to be restricted to integers. –  John Saunders Jan 30 '13 at 0:23

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