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I have to write a function that will read input from a file. The file is set up: one character, space, word, space, throughout the file, like such:

A space 1 space 2 space... etc

I need to extract the whitespace following the one character and NOT the whitespace following the word.

How can I go about doing this? Should I just make it so the function writes the whitespace itself instead of extracting it?

Also, I am importing this info into a 2-d char array. Will I run into problems trying to write integers to a char array?

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1  
std::cin::unsetf(std::ios::skipws) should be a start –  sehe Jan 30 '13 at 0:45
    
It's for class and we're limited to certain tools. We haven't been taught tokenization yet so I'd get in trouble for using it. –  Bobazonski Jan 30 '13 at 0:47
    
what are you saying? You can't use the standard library? It's in the C++ standard... (Otherwise, std::getline is your only viable way out) –  sehe Jan 30 '13 at 0:50
    
Why would you get in trouble for using stuff you haven't been taught? What is this, sunday school? (now, being required to explain the code is entirely different matter -- you shouldn't use code you don't understand) –  Eugene Jan 30 '13 at 1:03
2  
I would be happy if students learned from good SO posts as long as the actually learn it. They're simply making you do it a specific way to verify that you learned the recently taught material. –  doug65536 Jan 30 '13 at 1:14
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4 Answers 4

Something like this maybe?

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

int main() {
    char myChar;
    char theWS;
    std::string word;
    std::ifstream in("example.txt");

    while(in >> myChar >> std::noskipws >> theWS >> word >> std::skipws) {
        std::cout << myChar << theWS << word << '\n';
    }
}
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This assumes there's only one whitespace char, not sure if that's a valid assumption or not –  Mooing Duck Jan 30 '13 at 2:03
    
@MooingDuck I made the assumption based on what the OP said -- "The file is set up: one character, space, word, space, throughout the file" –  Rapptz Jan 30 '13 at 2:04
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You should've been exposed to the idea of a tokenizer by now. This is the structure you need.

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You will be fine writing integers into character arrays. Since C and C++ represent ascii characters as small numbers anyways, handling them is easy. Some examples of the number values which correspond to specific chars: '0' => 48, '1' => 49, ... , 'A' => 65, 'B' => 66, etc.

Take a look at http://www.asciitable.com/ for the full set of ascii characters and their corresponding values.

This also allows you to perform mathematical operations on characters such as 'A' + 1 => 'B' as well as convert between numbers and characters (char) 65 => 'A'

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How does this answer the question? –  Rapptz Jan 30 '13 at 1:16
1  
ASCII represents ASCII characters as small numbers. Neither C nor C++ requires ASCII to be employed here (see footnote 14 in C++11, for example); C only requires that the underlying values of lexical numerals be consecutive. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 30 '13 at 1:17
    
The last line of his question asks if he will run into issues writing integers into character arrays. –  ecullermayeno Jan 30 '13 at 1:33
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well if you can be certain of the format you could try:

#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

void file_read_func()
{
    string input;
    string ret;
    ifstream file;
    file.open("full file path");

    while (!file.eof())
    {
        file >> input;

        if (!file.eof())
        {
            ret += input;
            file >> input;
            ret += input + " ";
        }
    }

    return ret;
}

file streams separate by spaces and new lines, hence

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4  
1  
@Dumbledore: Er, yeah, and less horribly wrong. while (!strm.eof()) is almost always wrong, and you randomly perform file >> input 200% times more than would be correct. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 30 '13 at 1:12
4  
And by works, do you mean "it adds one extraneous copy of the input and a space at the end?" –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 30 '13 at 1:14
1  
@Dumbledore: I never downvote "valid responses and questions". Perhaps it's worth pondering why I really downvote your stuff. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 30 '13 at 1:15
2  
@JerryCoffin actually, in this case it just... It has one extra read in the if block, so it will... ideone.com/IQl1xQ... yeah, something like that. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 30 '13 at 1:18
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