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So I have this form where the user can enter in a start time and end time (for a booking). The values in the database are DateTimes, but the Date part is completely ignored. Currently, when I enter in eg. "5:00 pm" (through a jQuery time picker), it says this is not a valid date. If I type "30/1/2013 5:00 pm" it accepts this as valid... How do I change this behaviour to only validate as a time? (or if that's not ideal, how can I completely turn validation off for that field - I'll manually handle validation in the controller)

I saw this: http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/705643/a-data-val-date-attribute-is-generated-for-time-fields-in-asp-net-mvc-4# but Microsoft claims it has been fixed; not sure if this is the same problem. I don't want to change the database definition to TimeSpan because I believe it will muck up the existing data (it will won't it?).

Controller:

[HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Create(BookingDetailsDate bookingdetailsdates) //, FormCollection collection)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            try
            {
                //bookingdetailsdates.StartTime = DateTime.Parse(collection["StartTime"]); // TODO: do this better
                //bookingdetailsdates.EndTime   = DateTime.Parse(collection["EndTime"]);
                bookingdetailsdatesRepository.Add(bookingdetailsdates);
                bookingdetailsdatesRepository.Save();
                return RedirectToAction("Index", new { id = bookingdetailsdates.BookingDetailsID });
            }
            catch { }
        }
        return View(bookingdetailsdates);
    }

View:

@using (Html.BeginForm()) {
@Html.ValidationSummary(true)
<fieldset>
    <legend></legend>
...
    @Html.EditorFor(model => model.StartTime)

    @Html.EditorFor(model => model.EndTime)

    <p>
        <input type="submit" value="Save" />
    </p>
</fieldset>
}

Editor Template:

<div class="editor-label">
    @Html.LabelFor(m => m)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @if (Model.HasValue==true)
    {
        @Html.TextBox("", Model.Value.ToShortTimeString(), new { @class = "TimePicker" })
    }
    else
    {
        @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m, new { @class = "TimePicker" })
    }

    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(m => m)

</div>
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2 Answers

I think "DateTime" this data type is not a good choice, if you just want to save time that users save and then compare them in somewhere I suggest to use "nchar" type. Why? Let me explain, datetime is a very complicated type, it has many kinds of forms. Like "2013-1-29 5:00 pm", "2013/1/29 5:00pm". If your purpose is to compare and check if out of date, you can use this way. "201301291700", it's a fixed length which is 12. The benefit of this is 1. you can easy to save it anywhere by type string. 2. you can compare easily by convert to int type or maybe long type.(number is much easier to compare, isn't it?)

Answer is based on my experience, hope it helps you!

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Thanks for the reply :) That might be good in some cases, but I have existing data for this and I don't want to make loads of extra work thoroughly testing a conversion algorithm just to avoid using the DateTime class when I'm fairly confident there is some relatively straightforward way of disabling validation on two fields of a form. –  ninjamario Jan 30 '13 at 1:49
3  
I don't think this is a good idea. OP's problem is about user input and validation only, the backing data type should remain DateTime rather than a custom homebrew format. –  us2012 Jan 30 '13 at 1:50
    
"201301291700" is not a fixed length, because it will stop working when we reach the year 10000. –  O. R. Mapper Jan 30 '13 at 21:44
    
you're so kind, who can live thousands of years? –  Unknown Jan 30 '13 at 21:47
    
@Unknown: It doesn't matter whether we're still alive then, but assuming that the software we write now will have ceased to exist in the year 10000 is the same reasoning that was used when it was once decided that "two digits are enough to express a year". -- And, no, please do not take my comment entirely seriously ;-) I just couldn't resist adding this remark ;-) –  O. R. Mapper Jan 30 '13 at 21:49
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

So the trouble was in jQuery's validation, even though the metadata for my fields specified it would be a time only (and that wasn't even strictly necessary), jQuery's validate requires the box to contain a full datetime string...

Commenting out these lines fixes the problem:

<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
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