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I'm trying to convert a basic Backbone.js router declaration to TypeScript.

var AppRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({
    routes: {
        "*actions": "defaultRoute"
    },

    defaultRoute: function () {
        document.write("Default Route Invoked");
    }
});

var app_router = new AppRouter();

Backbone.history.start();

My converted code is the following which doesn't work:

class AppRouter extends Backbone.Router {
    routes = {
        "*actions": "defaultRoute"
    }

    defaultRoute() {
        document.write("Default Route Invoked");
    }
}

var app_router = new AppRouter();

Backbone.history.start();

I get no compile time or runtime errors but the code does not function. Why?

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3 Answers 3

I've had a look at Backbone.Router.extends and it isn't a basic prototype extension - so you can't just switch from Backbone.Router.extends to a TypeScript class extension.

I would change your TypeScript file to look more like your original JavaScript - you'll still get the benefit of intellisense and type checking - you just aren't using a class:

var AppRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({
    routes: {
        "*actions": "defaultRoute"
    },

    defaultRoute: function () {
        document.write("Default Route Invoked");
    }
});

var app_router = new AppRouter();

Backbone.history.start();
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Backbone source shows that the extend method is the same for all backbone types. Model.extend = Collection.extend = Router.extend = View.extend = History.extend = extend; where do you see difference in the router's prototype extension? –  orad Jan 30 '13 at 19:40
1  
I wasn't suggesting the Backbone ones are different to each other - they are different to the one generated by TypeScript when you use inheritance. You can use var app_router: Backbone.Router = ... but TypeScript will probably already type app_router without making it explicit. –  Steve Fenton Jan 30 '13 at 20:45
    
I expanded this question a little more in this other Q/A. –  orad Jan 31 '13 at 18:47
1  
@orad I answered your question. Take a look here –  Diullei Feb 2 '13 at 2:27

As Steve Fenton mentioned it's because Typescripts extend does not work in the same way as underscore / backones extend method.

The main problem is that the router calls _bindRoutes() before your routes field has been set in the "sub class" in type scripts hierachy.

A call to Backbone.Router.apply(this, arguments) in the constructor of your ts class as described by orad, ensures that this call will be made after the routes field has been set.

A manual call to this function will do the trick as well.

and just a FYI: call delegateEvents(this.events) in the constructor of your view classes if you want the dom events from your element to get triggered

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add all initialized fields in the constructor and make a call to super at the end:

class AppRouter extends Backbone.Router {

    routes: any;
    constructor(options?: Backbone.RouterOptions) {

        this.routes = {
            "*actions": "defaultRoute"
        }

        super(options);
    }

    initialize() {
        // can put more init code here to run after constructor
    }

    defaultRoute() {
        document.write("Default Route Invoked");
    }
}

var app_router = new AppRouter();

Backbone.history.start();
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