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The error reads:

request for member 'begin', 'end' in 'arr' which is non class type int[5], unable to deduce from expression error.

My code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int * mypointer;

    int arr[5] = {1,3,5,7,9};

    mypointer = arr;

    for(auto it = arr.begin(); it != arr.end(); ++it) {
        cout<<*mypointer<<endl;

        mypointer++;
    }

    return 0;
}
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4  
Try replacing arr.begin() and arr.end() with std::begin(arr) and std::end(arr) –  Joe Jan 30 '13 at 1:44
    
How did your favourite C++ book give you the impression calling a member function on an array was even possible? Besided that, what is the actual question (if it is "is this possible", then the compiler already gave it, if it is "how is this possible otherwise", then ask an actual question)? –  Christian Rau Jan 30 '13 at 9:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Arrays have no member functions as they aren't a class type. This is what the error is saying.

You can use std::begin(arr) and std::end(arr) from the <iterator> header instead. This also works with types that do have .begin() and .end() members, via overloading:

#include <array>
#include <vector>

#include <iterator>

int main()
{
    int c_array[5] = {};
    std::array<int, 5> cpp_array = {};
    std::vector<int> cpp_dynarray(5);

    auto c_array_begin = std::begin(c_array); // = c_array + 0
    auto c_array_end = std::end(c_array);     // = c_array + 5

    auto cpp_array_begin = std::begin(cpp_array); // = cpp_array.begin()
    auto cpp_array_end = std::end(cpp_array);     // = cpp_array.end()

    auto cpp_dynarray_begin = std::begin(cpp_dynarray); // = cpp_dynarray.begin()
    auto cpp_dynarray_end = std::end(cpp_dynarray);     // = cpp_dynarray.end()
}
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One thing I'd like to point out for you is that you really don't have to maintain a separate int* to use in dereferencing the array elements, apart from the whole member thing others have well pointed out.

Using a more modern approach, the code is both more readable, as well as safer:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <array>
#include <iterator>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    std::array<int, 5> cpp_array{1,3,5,7,9};

    // Simple walk the container elements.
    for( auto elem : cpp_array )
        cout << elem << endl;

    // Arbitrary element processing on the container.
    std::for_each( begin(cpp_array), end(cpp_array), [](int& elem) {
        elem *= 2;      // double the element.
        cout << elem << endl;
    });
}

Using the lambda in the second example allows you to conveniently perform arbitrary processing on the elements, if needed. In this example, I'm just showing doubling each element, but you can do something more meaningful within the lambda body instead.

Hope this makes sense and helps.

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In C++, arrays are not classes and therefore do not have any member methods. They do behave like pointers in some contexts. You can take advantage of this by modifying your code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int * mypointer;

    const int SIZE = 5;
    int arr[SIZE] = {1,3,5,7,9};

    mypointer = arr;

    for(auto it = arr; it != arr + SIZE; ++it) {
        cout<<*mypointer<<endl;

        mypointer++;
    }

    return 0;
}

Of course, this means that mypointer and it both contain the same address, so you don't need both of them.

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