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<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <style>
            p { margin: 4px; font-size:16px; font-weight:bolder;cursor:pointer; }
            .blue { color:blue; }
            .highlight { background:red; }
        </style>
        <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p class="blue">Click to toggle (<span>clicks: 0</span>)</p>
        <p class="blue highlight">highlight (<span>clicks: 0</span>)</p>
        <p class="blue">on these (<span>clicks: 0</span>)</p>
        <p class="blue">paragraphs (<span>clicks: 0</span>)</p>

        <script>
            var count = 0;
            $("p").each(function() {
                var $thisParagraph = $(this);
                var count = 0;
                $thisParagraph.click(function() {
                    count++;
                    $thisParagraph.find("span").text('clicks: ' + count);
                    $thisParagraph.toggleClass("highlight", count % 3 == 0);
                });
            });
        </script>
    </body>
</html>

My problem is function assigned to click event of all the paragraph elements are closure. So on click on the first paragraph element the var counter increases. When the user clicks on the second paragraph the counter variable should display 2, isn't it? But it is displaying 1.i m interested on why this is happening

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have defined var count twice. Leave out the one INSIDE the $("p").each(function(){...}). That var inside there makes the variable local to that function.

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what happens when i declare var count twice ,closure will refer to the var in the scope in which it was declared –  Maizere Pathak Jan 30 '13 at 2:50
1  
That's not really closure. Defining the variable inside the .each() using var causes that variable to be treated as a private member variable. –  mrunion Jan 30 '13 at 3:00
3  
@Maizere: If you declare a variable in an outer scope and an inner scope and reference it in an inner scope, the declaration in the inner scope takes precedence over the outer scope's declaration. –  icktoofay Jan 30 '13 at 3:00

The cause of the problem you describe is what mrunion said: you're redefining count as a local variable. However, you can also simplify your code a lot and get rid of the .each loop:

<script>
var count = 0;
$("p").click(function() {
    count++;
    var $thisParagraph = $(this);
    $thisParagraph.find("span").text('clicks: ' + count);
    $thisParagraph.toggleClass("highlight", count % 3 == 0);
});
</script>
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what happens when i declare var count twice ,closure will refer to the var in the scope in which it was declared – –  Maizere Pathak Jan 30 '13 at 2:53
    
Every function creates a new scope. If you declare var again inside a function, you shadow any closured variable with the same name from an outer scope. Your function will use the local one instead. –  bfavaretto Jan 30 '13 at 2:54
    
which var will the closure refer to –  Maizere Pathak Jan 30 '13 at 2:55
1  
Sorry, but I can't understand what you're confused about. If you redefine a variable inside a function you lose access to any outer, closured variable with the same name. –  bfavaretto Jan 30 '13 at 3:02
$("p").each(function () {
    var count = 0;
    $(this).click(function () {
        count++;
        $(this).find("span").text('clicks: ' + count);
        $(this).toggleClass("highlight", count % 3 == 0);
    });
});
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I don't think $.proxy is necessary here? –  bfavaretto Jan 30 '13 at 3:04
    
Yea you're right. I guess I misread the closure issue. –  Dennis Rongo Jan 30 '13 at 3:23

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