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Sorry if this is a rather basic question.

I have a page with an HTML form. The code looks like this:

<form action="submit.php" method="post">
  Example value: <input name="example" type="text" />
  Example value 2: <input name="example2" type="text" />
  <input type="submit" />
</form>

Then in my file submit.php, I have the following:

<?php
  $example = $_POST['example'];
  $example2 = $_POST['example2'];
  echo $example . " " . $example2;
?>

However, I want to eliminate the use of the external file. I want the $_POST variables on the same page. How would I do this?

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2  
Possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/4783381/same-page-processing –  Schleis Jan 30 '13 at 2:43
    
@Schleis Sorry, did not see that question. –  Piccolo Jan 30 '13 at 2:44
    
If youre just echoing the variable onclick it may be better to just use javascript –  Nick Jan 30 '13 at 2:44
    
@JohnDoe That was just an example. I'm not just echoing the variable. –  Piccolo Jan 30 '13 at 2:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Put this on a php file:

<?php
  if (isset($_POST['submit'])) {
    $example = $_POST['example'];
    $example2 = $_POST['example2'];
    echo $example . " " . $example2;
  }
?>
<form action="" method="post">
  Example value: <input name="example" type="text" />
  Example value 2: <input name="example2" type="text" />
  <input name="submit" type="submit" />
</form>

It will execute the whole file as PHP. The first time you open it, $_POST['submit'] won't be set because the form has not been sent. Once you click on the submit button, it will print the information.

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1  
An even better solution would be to leave the action attribute empty or leave it out altogether if you're using HTML5. –  thordarson Jan 30 '13 at 2:47
1  
@thordarson Thanks for the heads-up! however, I've always preferred to put it just to be explicit. I think $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'] would've been better for this example. –  KaeruCT Jan 30 '13 at 2:50

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