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ActionScript 3 passes an array by reference, by default. I must be making a rookie mistake. Here's a snapshot of my code:

private function testFunc():void {
    var testArray:Array=new Array();
    myFunction(testArray);
    trace(testArray); // []; length=0
}

private function myFunction(tArray:Array):void {
    tArray = myOtherFunction();
    trace(tArray); // 0, 1, 2; length=3
}

private function myOtherFunction():Array {
    var x:Array=new Array;
    for (var i:int=0; i<3; i++)
       x[i]=i;
    return x;
}

I can see that tArray is correct, but testArray is always empty. Any idea how to make testArray equal tArray? Thanks in advance.

http://help.adobe.com/en_US/AS2LCR/Flash_10.0/help.html?content=00000049.html

UPDATE:

For what it's worth, I found the following change (hack) to work:

private function myFunction(tArray:Array):void {
    var Z:Array=new Array;
    Z = myOtherFunction();
    for (var i:int=0; i<Z.length; i++)
        tArray[i]=Z[i];
}

Georgii's solution is better design though.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you pass testArray as a parameter to myFunction, its reference is copied and assigned to local reference tArray, such that inside of myFunction tArray points to the same object as testArray, but is in fact a different reference. That is why when you change tArray reference, testArray itself does not change.

private function testFunc():void {
    var testArray:Array=new Array(); 
    // testArray is a local variable, 
    // its value is a reference to an Array object
    myFunction(testArray);
    trace(testArray); // []; length=0
}

private function myFunction(tArray:Array):void {
    // tArray is a local variable, which value equals to testArray
    tArray = myOtherFunction(); 
    // now you changed it and tArray no longer points to the old array
    // however testArray inside of testFunc stays the same
    trace(tArray); // 0, 1, 2; length=3
}

What you probably want is:

private function testFunc():void {
    var testArray:Array=new Array();
    testArray = myFunction(testArray);
    trace(testArray); // 0, 1, 2; length=3
}

private function myFunction(tArray:Array):Array {
    // do what you want with tArray
    tArray = myOtherFunction();
    trace(tArray); // 0, 1, 2; length=3
    // return new value of the tArray
    return tArray;
}

private function myOtherFunction():Array {
    var x:Array=new Array;
    for (var i:int=0; i<3; i++)
       x[i]=i;
    return x;
}
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So it sounds like its not just a reference being copied, but a new reference to a newly created Array. Good find, this isn't exactly something that pops out of Adobe's documentation. –  Joshua Jewell Jan 30 '13 at 3:48
    
Thanks Georgii. Well, that does work, but my point was really to find out how to do it using the original 3 functions, which is a simplified view of my real application. I can't avoid going through myFunction(). Any way to do that? –  ggkmath Jan 30 '13 at 3:50
    
@ggkmath edited the suggested solution –  Georgii Oleinikov Jan 30 '13 at 3:56
    
I'm sorry for being a pain in the butt Georgii. Yes, that works well. However, I'm already using the return in myFunction() for another variable (not shown for simplicity). –  ggkmath Jan 30 '13 at 3:57
1  
@ggkmath You should make better design then. Create a class MyClass that will contain tArray as a member. Then pass this class to myFunction and let it change the contents of of MyClass by assigning new value to tArray. That way you can preserve your return value. –  Georgii Oleinikov Jan 30 '13 at 4:00

Basically what's happening is that you've passed your Array to the function, which in turn creates a local reference to it (within the function).

This means that if you decide to go ahead and assign a newly created Array to the local variable (tArray in your case), it will be used instead, and the original will retain its original instance.

This is the same for any object, for example with a Sprite:

var sprite:Sprite = new Sprite();

// We set the original Sprite's x to 10.
sprite.x = 10;

function mutilate(subject:Sprite):void
{
    // Notice here how we are making a new instance. This won't assign a new
    // instance to the "sprite" property that we've passed here, but rather
    // a new instance to the local variable "subject".
    subject = new Sprite();

    // And here we set the x of the new instance to 20.
    subject.x = 20;
}


mutilate(sprite);
trace(sprite.x); // Outputs 10, though you may have expected 20.
share|improve this answer
    
@ggkmath The line of concern that will prevent you from doing this is the first line in your myOtherFunction function. This is where you are creating a new instance of Array which in turn gets assigned to the local variable tArray within myFunction. There's no way to do what you're trying to do by passing the original array as an argument to a function - you will have to structure it so that what you actually do is have a function that returns the Array you expect, which you can then assign to testArray. –  Marty Jan 30 '13 at 4:02

Take the return of myOtherFunction() iterate through it and then call tArray.push() for each element. Currently all you are doing is changing a local reference to a newly created object.

You need to add elements to the original array which you lose the reference too on assignment.

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