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I have a mega data frame containing monthly stock returns from january 1970 to december 2009 (rows) for 7 different countries including the US (columns). My task is to regress the stock returns of each country (dependent variable) on the USA stock returns (independent variable) using the values of 4 different time periods namely the 70s, the 80s, the 90s and the 00s.

The data set (.csv) can be downloaded at: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BxaWFk-EO7tjbG43Yl9iQVlvazQ/edit

This means that I have 24 regressions to run seperately and report the results, which I have already done using the lm() function. However, I am currently attempting to use R smarter and create custom functions that will achieve my purpose and produce the 24 sets of results.

I have created sub data frames containing the observations clustered according to the time periods knowing that there are 120 months in a decade.

seventies = mydata[1:120, ] # 1970s (from Jan. 1970 to Dec. 1979)
eighties = mydata[121:240, ] # 1980s (from Jan. 1980to Dec. 1989)
nineties = mydata[241:360, ] # 1990s (from Jan. 1990 to Dec. 1999)
twenties = mydata[361:480, ] # 2000s (from Jan. 2000 to Dec. 2009)

NB: Each of the newly created variables are 120 x 7 matrices for 120 observations across 7 countries.

Running the 24 regressions using Java would require the use of imbricated for loops.

Could anyone provide the steps I must take to write a function that will arrive a the desired result? Some snippets of R code would also be appreciated. I am also thinking the mapply function will be used.

Thank you and let me know if my post needs some editing.

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migrated from stats.stackexchange.com Jan 30 '13 at 3:51

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2  
If you only want tips on efficient R coding this should probably go to stack overflow. If you want advice on whether lm is a good tool for this purpose or what an alternative strategy might be that can take into account the time series nature of the data it is ok here (but you haven't asked that question). As it stands though I don't quite get the purpose of the exercise - 24 models to fit doesn't seem excessive even if you do it by cutting and pasting a line of code 24 times, and the dataset is quite small, what is the imperative of finding an efficient way of doing it? –  Peter Ellis Jan 29 '13 at 2:47
    
@PeterEllis As I explained earlier, I have already done the exercise using the lm() function cutting and pasting 24 times. But I'm learning how to write functions in R, especially how not to use loops and I thought this exercise was suitable to gain such knowledge which could be more useful in the future since I want to make R my main programming language. –  SavedByJESUS Jan 29 '13 at 5:01
1  
I voted to close and migrate to stack exchange. I've given an answer along the lines of a programming homework example ignoring the statistical issues - but note that using regression like this with two time series is nearly always a bad idea, highly inclined to give spurious results. –  Peter Ellis Jan 29 '13 at 21:06

1 Answer 1

This isn't a complete answer but a start.

First, I think it's a mistake to split your data set into different objects. This just makes it harder to handle. Better would be to add an indicator variable to your data frame eg

> mydata <- as.data.frame(matrix(round(rnorm(480*7),1), ncol=7))
> names(mydata) <- c("USA", paste("country", 1:6, sep=""))
> 
> mydata$decade <- rep(c("seventies", "eighties", "nineties", "twenties"), rep(120,4))
> 
> head(mydata)
   USA country1 country2 country3 country4 country5 country6    decade
1  0.2     -0.1      0.8      0.9     -1.6     -0.1     -1.1 seventies
2  0.0     -0.5      0.1     -0.4     -1.2     -0.9      1.3 seventies
3  2.2      1.4      1.7      1.0     -1.6     -1.5      0.6 seventies
4 -0.5      2.5      0.2     -0.9      2.3      1.0      0.1 seventies
5 -0.1      0.0     -0.9     -1.4      0.7     -0.1     -0.1 seventies
6  0.3     -0.4      0.1      0.5      0.2      0.9     -0.5 seventies

My second tip would be to transform this into long format, using the reshape or reshape2 library eg

> library(reshape2)
> mydata.m <- melt(mydata, id.vars=c("USA", "decade"))
> head(mydata.m)
   USA    decade variable value
1  0.2 seventies country1  -0.1
2  0.0 seventies country1  -0.5
3  2.2 seventies country1   1.4
4 -0.5 seventies country1   2.5
5 -0.1 seventies country1   0.0
6  0.3 seventies country1  -0.4

From here you have a range of options. You could use tapply() from base, or something from plyr package. You could even fit it as one big model, with interaction between variable and decade (gives similar but not identical results to your 24 models which will alow separate estimates of residual variance). eg with tapply get started by:

> country <- with(mydata.m, tapply(USA, list(decade, variable), function(x){x}))
> country
          country1    country2    country3    country4    country5    country6   
eighties  Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120
nineties  Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120
seventies Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120
twenties  Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120 Numeric,120
> country[1,1]
[[1]]
  [1]  0.2  1.1  0.2  0.1 -0.1  2.1 -2.4 -0.5 -0.5 -0.3  0.1 -0.9 -0.6 -0.1  0.8  0.9  0.4  0.6 -0.5  0.4
 [21] -1.3  0.9  0.0 -1.0  0.2 -0.2  0.0 -0.5  0.0  1.4  0.7 -0.9 -1.1  1.7  0.5 -1.0  1.1  0.1  0.3  0.8
 [41] -0.5 -1.9 -1.5 -0.2  0.5 -0.8 -1.2  1.0  0.3  1.7 -0.5  1.2 -0.1  0.9  0.9  0.5 -1.8  0.7  0.1  0.7
 [61]  0.4  0.2 -0.7  2.1  0.2 -1.1 -1.4  1.7 -0.4 -1.0  0.0  1.0 -0.6  1.5  0.4  0.3 -0.2 -1.0 -0.8  1.0
 [81]  0.4 -0.3  1.2  0.9 -0.8  0.2 -0.7 -1.3  0.4 -0.7  0.7  1.5 -0.7 -0.3 -2.3  0.3  0.6 -0.9 -0.5  0.4
[101]  0.4 -0.8  0.2  0.2  0.3 -1.0 -1.0  0.6 -2.8 -0.2  2.7  1.1 -0.5 -0.1 -0.6 -0.6 -0.2  0.1  0.0 -0.9

and so on. The plyr package will probably give you some elegant way of fitting the models that avoids tapply. How you proceed will depend in part on how you want to store the model results - do you want the whole model, or just a summary statistic from each one, etc.

I wouldn't be afraid to use loops at some point if it appears necessary. Loops are nearly always a bad idea in R for doing something one element at a time in a vector, but using them to do something one model at a time can sometimes be more transparent for the reader of the code than more esoteric operations. When the data is counted in thousands of rows rather than millions, speed of operation won't be an issue (your dataset here is actually pretty small for example), so transparency of code and ease of checking becomes a real criterion in choosing your programming approach.

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! THank you very much for your detailed answer!!! –  SavedByJESUS Jan 30 '13 at 6:20

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