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This is embarrassing. I learned C# a long time ago and am just now attempting to understand this question about classes (since they are reference types, of course).

Here's the question: If I create two new instances of a class called Person and named one instance P and the other Q (who cares why I'd call it Q) and set P.Name to "James" and then set Q.Name to "Suzie", would P.Name be set to "Suzie"? Or am I not understanding this correctly?

Thanks everyone

Thanks everyone for helping me with this. I assumed what was explained to me was the case. But the explanations in the tutorials I read weren't clear and I haven't had a computer in a few months so as to have tested it out myself.

P.s I chose the first right answer that was clear to me. But noticed several. Thanks again for everyone's help.

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Yes. Sorry. That was a mistake –  iDevJunkie Jan 30 '13 at 4:12
    
1  
Note: I mean this to be helpful, not rude :). You could have just TRIED this much faster and with fewer characters than it took to type the question. ideone.com/b4N2nb. Plus you get into the good habit of discovering how to answer your own questions, have a test bed, etc. –  aquinas Jan 30 '13 at 4:24
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They would only be the same value if the Name property was static, or you had some logic in your property get/set methods to make them equal. –  D Stanley Jan 30 '13 at 4:26
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The short answer is NO, changing Q.Name will no affect P.Name. As in

 var p = new Person();
 var q = new Person();
 p.Name = "James";
 q.Name = "Suzie";

However, if q points to the p instance, then changing q would also change p. As in:

 var p = new Person();
 var q = p;
 p.Name = "James";
 q.Name = "Suzie";

Both q and q Name are now "Suzie".

With data initialisers you can write the first example as:

var p = new Person { Name = "James" };
var q = new Person { Name = "Suzie" };

which I think is much easier to read.

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+1, although tangenting into initializers seems irrelevant. –  D Stanley Jan 30 '13 at 4:23
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@DStanley OP says he learnt C# long time ago. So I thought I should mention a useful new feature in passing. –  Richard Schneider Jan 30 '13 at 4:27
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Example:

// p and q are separate in the below example..

Person p = new Person();
Person q = new Person();

p.Name = "James";
q.Name = "Suzie";

Console.WriteLine(p.Name); // "James"
Console.WriteLine(q.Name); // "Suzie"

// both p and q refer to the same object, so both are "Suzie" in the below example
Person p = new Person();
Person q = p;

p.Name = "James";
q.Name = "Suzie";

Console.WriteLine(p.Name); // "Suzie"
Console.WriteLine(q.Name); // "Suzie"
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If you create two instances? No, they will be 2 separate objects.

Person person1 = new Person();
person1.Name = "James";
Person person2 = new Person();
person2.Name = "Suzie";
Console.WriteLine(person1.Name);
Console.WriteLine(person2.Name);

That will print out James and then Suzie, since they are 2 different objects. If you did this, however:

Person person1 = new Person();
person1.Name = "James";
Person person2 = person1;
person2.Name = "Suzie";
Console.WriteLine(person1.Name);
Console.WriteLine(person2.Name);

That will print Suzie and Suzie. This is because person1 and person2 both reference the same object.

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No this is not, because both are P and Q different instance of class Person. Both object or instance define on different memoery location. see this tutorial

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This will definitely not change the P.Name to Suzie as you have created two instances of the same class, it means that you have allocated two different memory locations on heap for these two instance.

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