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I read some articles about how to use log4j. Most of them give below code as a beginning:

 Logger logger = Logger.getLogger("com.foo.Bar");

or

 Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(XXX.class);

This will initialize the logger object.But my question is why need send the class type as pramameter? It seems when I use the logger, I don't care in which class I use it.So the Class type seems no effect to logger. If I declare a logger as static and public, I can call this logger at another class, So what's the intention of the author to desgin it like this? Will the Class type bind someting when I use the logger? Or I can send any Class types to the getLogger function.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted
  1. You can always use any string as logger name other than class type. It's definitely ok.

  2. The reason why many people use class type, I guess:

    • Easy to use. You don't need to worry about logger name duplication in a complex Java EE application. If other people also use your logger name, you may have a log file including no only the output of your class;

    • Easy to check the logging class, as the logger name will show in the log file. You can quickly navigate to the specific class;

    • When you distribute you class, people may want to redirect the logging from your class to a specific file or somewhere else. In such case, if you use a special logger name, we may need to check the source code or imposssible to do that if souce is unavailable.

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From the javadoc: Logger.getLogger(Class) is a shorthand for getLogger(clazz.getName()). A convention used with log4j and other logging frameworks is to define a static logger per class. For example,

public class SomeClass {
    private static final Logger LOG = Logger.getLogger(SomeClass.class);
    ...
}

I have found this convention to work well for organizing logging output. It's certainly not required but is a useful practice.

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XXX.class is to Name your Logger i.e to flag subsequent log statements . To give you an idea which class certain log statements belongs to / originated from.

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You can trace your log by class type.

example1:

public class Bar {
    Logger logger = Logger.getLogger("com.foo.Bar");
    ...
    logger.debug("debug message");
}

Maybe you can see below a log message.

DEBUG: **com.foo.Bar** debug message

example2:

public class Foo {
    Logger logger = Logger.getLogger("com.foo.Foo");
    ...
    logger.debug("debug message");
}

Maybe you can see below a log message.

DEBUG: **com.foo.Foo** debug message

If you have a lot of java class and logger message, It's too difficult to find where log messages are from.

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That's useful, but I can format my log content to categorize my log. –  roast_soul Jan 30 '13 at 4:59

1:you can use "class name" or "string name" when you define in log4j.properties before, such as

log4j.logger.anything=INFO,anything

so,you can record your log as

 Logger logger = Logger.getLogger("anything");

2:If you define some log name,you can check it easily,cus they are separate.

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