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Possible Duplicate:
Start thread with member function

While defining a thread constructor with class method in c++0x as shown below, i get function cannot be resolved. What am i doing wrong?

For example, if i have

#include <thread>
 using namespace std;
class A
{
 public:
    void doSomething();
    A();
}

Then in Class A's constructor, i want to start a thread with doSomething. If i write like below, i get error that doSomething is not resolved. I even this->doSomething.

 A::A()
 {
     thread t(doSomething);
  }
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by inf, user763305, femtoRgon, Björn Kaiser, JcFx Feb 1 '13 at 17:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try this:

class A
{
 public:
   void doSomething();

   A()
   {
      thread t(&A::doSomething, this);
    }
};

OR

class A
{
 public:
   static void doSomething();

   A()
   {
      thread t(&A::doSomething);
    }
};

Note: you need to join your thread somewhere, for example:

class A
{
public:
   void doSomething()
   {
      std::cout << "output from doSomething" << std::endl;
   }

   A(): t(&A::doSomething, this)
   {
   }
   ~A()
   {
     if(t.joinable())
     {
        t.join();
     }
   }

private:
  std::thread t;  
};

int main() 
{
    A a;        
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ty, that worked. Will it not work if i dont pass "this" ? – Jimm Jan 30 '13 at 4:44
1  
unless soSomething is static member function – billz Jan 30 '13 at 4:45
    
great!! tys for the response. – Jimm Jan 30 '13 at 4:46
    
@Jimm, It takes the function, followed by a list of arguments to pass. That function needs an instance. – chris Jan 30 '13 at 4:46
    
In case of static, why would it not be &A::doSomething as opposed to A::doSomething ? – Jimm Jan 30 '13 at 4:49

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