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I have a very long string of text with () and [] in it. I'm trying to remove the characters between the parentheses and brackets but I cannot figure out how.

The list is similar to this:

x = "This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]"

This list isn't what I'm working with but is very similar and a lot shorter.

Thanks for the help.

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5  
Please show what you've tried (by editing your question NOT by adding a comment), and people will point you in the right direction. –  bernie Jan 30 '13 at 4:50
4  
may () or [] be nested e.g., "[a [(b] ([c))]]"? –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 30 '13 at 4:55
    
Do you have () or [] nested?? As said by @J.F.Sebastian –  Pradyun Jan 30 '13 at 9:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should work for parens. regular expressions will 'consume' the text it has matched so it won't work for nested parens.

import re
regex = re.compile(".*?\((.*?)\)")
result = re.findall(regex, mystring)

or this would find one set of parens... simply loop to find more

start = mystring.find( '(' )
end = mystring.find( ')' )
if start != -1 and end != -1:
  result = mystring[start+1:end]
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The second version is incorrect. if ( isn't found, then find returns -1 which is a True-like value in python. Also, if ( is the first character, find will return 0 which is Falsy. –  mgilson Jan 30 '13 at 5:19
    
That's right. I wrote if start and end:. That is not correct. Change to if start != -1 and end != -1. –  mbowden Jan 30 '13 at 5:36

Run this script, it works even with nested brackets.
Uses basic logical tests.

def a(test_str):
    ret = ''
    skip1c = 0
    skip2c = 0
    for i in test_str:
        if i == '[':
            skip1c += 1
        elif i == '(':
            skip2c += 1
        elif i == ']' and skip1c > 0:
            skip1c -= 1
        elif i == ')'and skip2c > 0:
            skip2c -= 1
        elif skip1c == 0 and skip2c == 0:
            ret += i
    return ret

x = "ewq[a [(b] ([c))]] This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]"
x = a(x)
print x
print repr(x)

Just incase you don't run it,
Here's the output:

>>> 
ewq This is a sentence.  
'ewq This is a sentence.  ' 
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elif skip1c == 0 and skip2c == 0: might be more readable than elif skip1c + skip2c == 0: –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 30 '13 at 12:02
    
@J.F.Sebastian Yes.. Made the change. –  Pradyun Jan 30 '13 at 12:04

You can use re.sub function.

>>> import re 
>>> x = "This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]"
>>> re.sub("([\(\[]).*?([\)\]])", "\g<1>\g<2>", x)
'This is a sentence. () []'

If you want to remove the [] and the () you can use this code:

>>> import re 
>>> x = "This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]"
>>> re.sub("[\(\[].*?[\)\]]", "", x)
'This is a sentence.  '

Important: This code will not work with nested symbols

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it doesn't work if x = "ewq[a [(b] ([c))]]", it gives 'ewq )]]' not 'eqw'... –  Pradyun Jan 30 '13 at 9:30
    
@paddila I know but Tic does not say anything about nested symbols. –  jvallver Jan 30 '13 at 9:34
    
I commented asking him about it.. he hasn't responded yet –  Pradyun Jan 30 '13 at 9:35

Here's a solution similar to @paddila's answer:

def remove_text_inside_brackets(text, brackets="()[]"):
    count = [0] * (len(brackets) // 2) # count open/close brackets
    saved_chars = []
    for character in text:
        for i, b in enumerate(brackets):
            if character == b: # found bracket
                kind, is_close = divmod(i, 2)
                count[kind] += (-1)**is_close # `+1`: open, `-1`: close
                if count[kind] < 0: # unbalanced bracket
                    count[kind] = 0
                break
        else: # character is not a bracket
            if not any(count): # outside brackets
                saved_chars.append(character)
    return ''.join(saved_chars)

print(repr(remove_text_inside_brackets(
    "This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]")))
# -> 'This is a sentence.  '
share|improve this answer
    
Looks complex at first glance, but is better than mine (and definitely the accepted (my opinion)) –  Pradyun Mar 17 '13 at 15:54

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