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Currently trying to figure out what the issue is with this sort. Built directly from the in-place Quicksort pseudocode from Wikipedia, which I am going to assume is reliable. I am attempting to sort an array of structs by a null-terminated 3-character "code" field.

The sort mostly works, but there are always a few elements out of place. I can only assume this has to do with the pivot somehow, but I have spent a few hours staring at it and have gotten nowhere. Thanks!

void quicksort(Cdir *directory, int left, int right) {

    if (left < right) {
        int pivotIdx = left;
        pivotIdx = partition(directory, left, right, pivotIdx);
        quicksort(directory, left, pivotIdx - 1);
        quicksort(directory, pivotIdx + 1, right);
    }
}

int partition(Cdir *directory, int left, int right, int pivot) {

    char *pivotVal = directory[pivot].code;
    int curIdx = left;
    swap(&directory[pivot], &directory[right]);

    int i;
    for (i = left; i < right; i++) {
        if (strncmp(directory[i].code, pivotVal, 3) < 0) {
            swap(&directory[i], &directory[curIdx]);
            curIdx++;
        }
    }
    swap(&directory[curIdx], &directory[right]);
    return curIdx;
} 

void swap(Cdir *s1, Cdir *s2) {

    Cdir temp = *s1; 
    *s1 = *s2;
    *s2 = temp;
}
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3  
Is there any reason you're writing the quicksort by hand instead of just using the standard library qsort? –  Yuushi Jan 30 '13 at 5:48
1  
This is part of a school assignment and one of the requirements is that you write your own sort. I could easily write an insertion sort or bubble sort or something, but what's the fun in writing a sort that you already know how to write? ;) –  user2004672 Jan 30 '13 at 5:56
    
@Yuushi i think SO writes qsort by yourself because he is studying –  Zagorulkin Dmitry Jan 30 '13 at 5:58

4 Answers 4

You have a bug in this line in partition(..):

for (i = left; i < right - 1; i++)

The code in wikipedia assumes right-1 is included in the loop, should be <=.

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Thank you! Interestingly enough, this doesn't entirely fix the problem (although it is significantly closer). –  user2004672 Jan 30 '13 at 6:01

I'm just going to say it... Please don't consider this as an actual answer to your question because it's not.

As a programmer, you are going to spend almost all your time solving problems by yourself. This is an opportunity to start to learn how to do that. If you get into the habit of finding out why your program behaves in a certain way by experimenting, you will become a far better programmer than someone who just asks people what is wrong.

Staring at code can get you to a point, but you won't always get past that point without seeing the data that is actually being used. This is what debugging is all about: knowing where your program is, what it's doing, and what its variables contain.

The simplest technique for debugging code is to use printf to tell you what's going on.

Imagine if your program output something like this:

Quicksorting on range 1 to 6
Partitioning on range 1 to 6
  Sub-array before:
    bob
    nelly
    harold
    yasmine
    fred
    roger
  Sub-array after:
    (you get the idea)
Partition returned pivot index of 5
Quicksorting on range 1 to 4
  (etc etc)

Well, it can. It's pretty easy to insert a few printf calls, and suddenly you get a massive output from your program which you write to file and then look over. It will quickly become apparent if there's something silly going on, and it only took a moment to add some traces to your code and recompile.

Happy coding.

share|improve this answer
    
I am quite aware of this and love the aspect of problem solving that programming presents. But sometimes the best method of debugging is just having somebody else glance at your code for two seconds. I was hoping that this was a simple error that I had just overlooked and would be noticed immediately by somebody with an outside perspective, but unfortunately this is not the case. I do agree with you though - many people use SO as a way to circumvent having to solve their own problems whilst learning to write code, which is very much missing the point of the discipline. –  user2004672 Jan 30 '13 at 15:09
    
That's fine, and I didn't mean to be rude or condescending. The principle still holds. The first thing you do is say "why is my program behaving like this?", and it is nearly always faster for you to put in some debugging info than it is to show and/or explain your code to someone who has never seen it before. If you can't answer the question "what is the program state on line X after calls Y and Z" then you are not ready to ask for someone else to review your code. The more you develop this habit, the less "where's the bug" questions you'll ask. Glad you found your problem in the end. –  paddy Jan 30 '13 at 21:20
    
You're certainly right. And if it makes you feel better, your response is what caused me to take another shot at debugging and ultimately find the error. So thank you! :) –  user2004672 Jan 30 '13 at 23:46
    
Haha, so it was an answer after all ;-) –  paddy Jan 30 '13 at 23:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I finally figured it out. When I replaced "pivotVal" in my string comparison with a direct reference to the pivot value (directory[right]), the sort works fine. Still trying to decide why that is, but it is fixed!

void quicksort(Cdir directory[], int left, int right) {

    if (left < right) {
        int pivotIdx = left;
        pivotIdx = partition(directory, left, right, pivotIdx);
        quicksort(directory, left, pivotIdx - 1);
        quicksort(directory, pivotIdx + 1, right);
    }
}

int partition(Cdir directory[], int left, int right, int pivot) {

    int curIdx = left;
    swap(&directory[pivot], &directory[right]);

    int i;
    for (i = left; i < right; i++) {
        if (strncmp(directory[i].code, directory[right].code, 3) < 0) {
            swap(&directory[i], &directory[curIdx]);
            curIdx++;
        }
    }
    swap(&directory[curIdx], &directory[right]);

    return curIdx;
} 

void swap(Cdir *s1, Cdir *s2) {

    Cdir temp = *s1; 
    *s1 = *s2;
    *s2 = temp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. What is your Cdir? –  glagolig Jan 30 '13 at 18:47
    
Quick question... Why do you only compare up to three characters of the string? Shouldn't you compare the entire string? –  paddy Jan 30 '13 at 21:22
    
The string in question is a 3-character country code - although now that you mention it, they ARE null-terminated so strcmp would work... @glagolig: It is a struct containing a 3 character country code and a size_t which contains the offset location of the corresponding "Country" struct in an external binary file. The assignment requires using this directory to look up / seek to corresponding countries in the external file. ;) –  user2004672 Jan 30 '13 at 23:47
1  
It would be safer to use strcmp in that case, because you might want to use this code somewhere else without having to scratch your head over why it doesn't always quite work. Contrived example in this case I know, because once you've done this exercise you'll use qsort forever after. =) –  paddy Jan 30 '13 at 23:49
1  
">user2004672: It is a struct containing a 3 character country code" so is it struct { char code[4]; ...} or struct { char* code; ...} ? If it is the further the problem is clear: your pivotVal used to change after each swap involving pivot. –  glagolig Jan 31 '13 at 1:24

I don't think you should change the for loop to i <= right as glagolig suggested because the purpose of swap(pivot, right) and i < right is to remove pivot from the array and work on an array 1 element smaller. The algorithm looks perfectly correct to me, maybe the problem is in how you call the function.
You should call the function with right argument as the last index in the array not the size of the array i.e. if you have Cdir arr[10]; you should call quicksort(arr, 0 ,9);
Also you could help people help you more if you post an example of input with wrong output.
I would have added this as a comment but I don't have enough rep to do so :-)

share|improve this answer
    
it used to be " < right-1 " as in my answer. –  glagolig Jan 30 '13 at 18:46
    
Sorry, my mistake. I suspect Cdir.code is not a char* but an array that is overwritten each swap. –  bahaa Jan 30 '13 at 22:15

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