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I have written this stored procedure :

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[spGetCuisines]
    @RestaurantID INT ,
    @CuisineID NVARCHAR(200)
AS 
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(MAX)

    SET @sql = 'SELECT  CuisineID, CuisineName
    FROM    dbo.Cuisine1
    WHERE   CuisineID IN (
            SELECT  dbo.Dishes1.CuisineID
            FROM    dbo.Dishes1
            WHERE   DishID IN ( SELECT  DishID
                                FROM    dbo.RestaurantDish
                                WHERE   RestaurantID = '
        + CAST(@RestaurantID AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) + ' ) )'                                    
    IF @CuisineID <> ''
        BEGIN
            SET @sql += 'AND Cuisine1.CuisineID IN('
                + CAST(@CuisineID AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) +')'
        END
    EXECUTE sp_executesql @sql; 
END

I am using 3 tables with their columns listed below:

Dishes1

   DishID
   DishName
   CuisineID
   Price 

Cuisine1

   CuisineID
   CuisineName
   Type
   DateCreated
   DateModified
   DateDeleted

RestaurantDish

RestaurantDishID
RestaurantID
DishID

but my stored procedure gives me syntax error on this line:

    SET @sql += 'AND Cuisine1.CuisineID IN('+ CAST(@CuisineID AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) +')'

it says:

incorrect syntax near "+"

Can somebody guide me? Does the SQL Server version have something to do with this?

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2  
Well, which version of SQL Server are you using? –  marc_s Jan 30 '13 at 6:27
4  
also, have you heard of joins? –  Mitch Wheat Jan 30 '13 at 6:29
    
i am using sql 2005 –  just a learner Jan 30 '13 at 6:31
    
yes. i know about joins. what to do with them? –  just a learner Jan 30 '13 at 6:31
1  
Do you even need to do the cast; it's already an NVARCHAR? Also, your primary keys should not be maximum length strings. –  pickypg Jan 30 '13 at 6:32
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The syntax you are using is only valid on SQL Server 2008 and above. On SQL Server 2005, you'll have to change:

SET @sql += ...

To:

SET @sql = @sql + ...
share|improve this answer
    
tthank you so much. it worked for me :) –  just a learner Jan 30 '13 at 6:33
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There's absolutely no need to use dynamic SQL here - so don't ! Also: prefer JOIN over subqueries - joins are typically faster, and quite frankly - code is much easier to read!

Just use:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[spGetCuisines]
    @RestaurantID INT ,
    @CuisineID NVARCHAR(200)
AS 
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(MAX)

    SELECT  
        c.CuisineID, c.CuisineName
    FROM    
        dbo.Cuisine1 c
    INNER JOIN
        dbo.Dishes1 d ON d.CuisineID = c.CuisineID
    INNER JOIN
        dbo.Restaurant1 r ON r.DishID = d.DishID
    WHERE  
        r.RestaurantID = @RestaurantID
        AND (@CuisineID = '' OR c.CuisineID = @CuisineID)
END

And Aaron Bertrand is absolutely right, of course - this only works if you pass in a single CuisineID as string.

If your @CuisineID parameter contains multiple values then you need something like this instead:

    WHERE  
        r.RestaurantID = @RestaurantID
        AND (@CuisineID = '' OR c.CuisineID IN dbo.Split(@CuisineID))

Using a function Split you can split up a comma-separated list of ID's into a table variable and use the IN operator to match to a list of possible values.

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Only true if @CuisineID is actually an integer - I suspect it might be a comma separated list of IDs. –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 30 '13 at 6:34
    
@AaronBertrand: you're absolutely right - but it should at least steer the OP in the right direction - I hope! :-) –  marc_s Jan 30 '13 at 6:36
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are you perhaps passing in a comma delimited string?? If so, there is a better way to handle this, see here:

http://codebetter.com/raymondlewallen/2005/10/26/quick-t-sql-to-parse-a-delimited-string/

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