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static inline void ext4_ext_store_pblock(struct ext4_extent *ex,
                     ext4_fsblk_t pb)
{
    ex->ee_start_lo = cpu_to_le32((unsigned long) (pb & 0xffffffff));
    ex->ee_start_hi = cpu_to_le16((unsigned long) ((pb >> 31) >> 1) &
                      0xffff);
}

This code is from linux kernel. See last line. it does pb>>31 then >>1 Is this same as pb >> 32 why not do that?

thank you

EDITED: thank you all. sent patch to ext4 maillist

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What datatype is pb? IOW, what is ext4_fsblk_t? –  Mysticial Jan 30 '13 at 6:40
1  
typedef unsigned long long ext4_fsblk_t; –  Anders Lind Jan 30 '13 at 6:42
1  
pb is guaranteed to be at least 64-bits. So shifting by 32 will not invoke undefined behavior. If anything, I'd have to guess that the whoever wrote that code was probably a little paranoid and wasn't sure of the nitty gritty details of the standard. –  Mysticial Jan 30 '13 at 6:50
    
@Mysticial or, perhaps, parts of the code used to be 32-bit. –  Alexey Frunze Jan 30 '13 at 6:52
1  
@AndersLind If discussion pops up in the mailing list, it would be nice if you bring an update here too. I just found your posting in the archive for those interested in looking up themself: news.gmane.org/… –  junix Jan 30 '13 at 7:55
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The two approaches are not quite the same thing, depending on the underlying data types. The standard (C11, 6.5.7 Bitwise shift operators) states that:

If the value of the right operand is negative or is greater than or equal to the width of the promoted left operand, the behavior is undefined.

Hence, if you were to shift a 32-bit wide integer type 32 bits to the right, it would result in undefined behaviour. However, shifting it 31 bits and then another bit is well defined.

That particular point, while a reason why someone may do this, is probably moot in this particular case. Given your type is unsigned long long (guaranteed 64 bits width), there should be no difference between (x >> 31) >> 1 and x >> 32.

However, if some platform actually defines ext4_fsblk_t as a 32-bit type (or if it's carried forward from an earlier implementation which allowed a 32-bit type (a)), you would find yourself having to resort to the two-stage shift to guarantee defined behaviour.


(a): There was an interim stage between ext3 and ext4 which allowed ext3 to move to 48 bits with its extents, a stepping stone on the way to ext4 with its 64-bit data types. Prior to that, 8TB was the practical limit to file systems.

It's possible, though I haven't confirmed, that this code snippet is a hangover from that transition, before the underlying data types went up to 64 bits wide.

The type that came to be used, sector_t, was conditionally defined as either u64 or unsigned long, which may explain why the code is there in the first place. In situations where it was defined as the latter, a two-stage shift may have been needed.

However, given that ext4 has left this interim stage behind, I'm not sure the two-stage shift is needed any more. Best bet is to raise a change request and see if it gets shot down by the developers :-)

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Well, shifting by 31 bits (for a signed 32-bit integer) already has the effect of copying the sign bit to all the bits. So I fail to see the purpose of shifting by 32. –  Mysticial Jan 30 '13 at 6:43
    
@Mystical: It's unsigned so should be a logical shift. I guess long long may be 32 bits though so this is to prevent undefined behavior in that case. –  Guy Sirton Jan 30 '13 at 6:45
1  
@Mystical, yes, that may apply for signed integers, but that's not necessarily the case here. –  paxdiablo Jan 30 '13 at 6:45
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@GuySirton Oh now I see the comment. It's an unsigned long long. That's guaranteed to be at least 64 bits. –  Mysticial Jan 30 '13 at 6:45
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@paxdiablo Well a minimum of research would have pointed that out. As ext4 defines 64 bit blocknumbers (lxr.free-electrons.com/source/fs/ext4/ext4.h#L72 ) ext4_fsblk_t is unlikely to be defined as 32-bit type as this would break the ext4 format. –  junix Jan 30 '13 at 7:03
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I could imagine that the code has ben copied from ext3 where ext3_fsblk_t is defined as unsigned long (32 bits). In this case paxdiablo's argument was correct:

The standard (C11, 6.5.7 Bitwise shift operators) states that:

If the value of the right operand is negative or is greater than or equal to the width of the promoted left operand, the behavior is undefined.

Hence, if you shift a 32-bit integer 32 bits to the right, it's undefined. However, shifting it 31 bits and then another bit is defined.

For ext4_fsblk_t is defined as unsigned long long and long long is in turn guaranteed to be 64 bit this code does not make sense anymore.

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2  
there is a config option to use the ext4 driver for ext2 and ext3 though, but not sure what effect that would have –  technosaurus Jan 30 '13 at 7:13
2  
@technosaurus As this option obviously won't change the type of ext4_fsblk_t I don't think there is an influence. But +1 for pointing this out. Thank you. –  junix Jan 30 '13 at 7:23
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