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I am using the following code to throw an error if the size of vector (declared as vector<int> vectorX) is is different than intended.

vector<int> vectorX;
int intendedSize = 10;
// Some stuff here
if((int)(vectorX.size()) != (intendedSize)) {
    cout << "\n Error! mismatch between vectorX "<<vectorX.size()<<" and intendedSize "<<intendedSize;
    exit(1);
}

The cout statement shows the same size for both. The comparison is not showing them to be equal.

Output is Error! mismatch between vectorX 10 and intendedSize 10

Where is the error? Earlier I tried (unsigned int)(intendedSize) but that too showed them unequal.

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2  
what was the output? –  Karthik T Jan 30 '13 at 7:55
2  
Also, please show us your actual code. –  NPE Jan 30 '13 at 7:57
    
@NPE Sorry, I tried to simplify actual code by typing it in question. In that process I made typo. –  user13107 Jan 30 '13 at 7:59
3  
Write a short complete program that demonstrates the problem and then, before posting it, compile and execute it, to test that it actually has the same problem. You'll find that the demo program doesn't have the problem you thought it did and the problen is actually somewhere else than you thought. So keep searching for it. –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 30 '13 at 8:20
    
@user1131467 thanks for suggestion. –  user13107 Jan 30 '13 at 8:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are missing ) in the right side of if statement

if((int)(vectorX.size()) != (intendedSize)) {
                                          ^^^
}

But note, it's bad to cast return value of std::vector::size to int. You lose half of the possibilities of what the size could be(thanks to chris).

You should write:

size_t intendedSize = 10; 
// OR unsign int intendedSize  = 10; 
if(vectorX.size() != intendedSize) {
}
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Thanks. You mean we can't go from size_t to int but we can go from int to size_t? –  user13107 Jan 30 '13 at 8:00
    
@user13107, You lose half of the possibilities of what the size could be. –  chris Jan 30 '13 at 8:02
    
Thanks. I have corrected the typo. Even then the values are not being shown to be equal. What you said about casting, is it the reason behind this? Actually, I don't want to do size_t intendedSize because that variable is used as int at other places. –  user13107 Jan 30 '13 at 8:05
    
Because the size can only ever be positive, and int takes half the range and instead goes into the negatives. I should have said differently before as well, but it could be much more than half if sizeof(size_t) > sizeof(int). –  chris Jan 30 '13 at 8:07
    
or use unsigned int, can you do that? –  billz Jan 30 '13 at 8:09

Use the size_t type to hold collection sizes:

vector<int> vectorX;
size_t intendedSize = 10;
// Some stuff here
if(vectorX.size() != intendedSize) {
     ... 
}

Actually technically you should use vector<int>::size_type but in practice this is always a typedef for size_t

An int is usually a signed 32-bit integer.

size_t is usually an unsigned 64-bit integer (on 64-bit architectures) or an unsigned 32-bit integer (on 32-bit architectures).

(Note that the standard doesn't enforce those constraints. The ABI specifies this, for example the x86 and x86-64 ABI do.)

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