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Scott Meyers posted content and status of his next book EC++11. He wrote that one item in the book could be "Avoid std::enable_if in function signatures".

std::enable_if can be used as a function argument, as a return type or as a class template or function template parameter to conditionally remove functions or classes from overload resolution.

In this question all three solution are shown.

As function parameter:

template<typename T>
struct Check1
{
   template<typename U = T>
   U read(typename std::enable_if<
          std::is_same<U, int>::value >::type* = 0) { return 42; }

   template<typename U = T>
   U read(typename std::enable_if<
          std::is_same<U, double>::value >::type* = 0) { return 3.14; }   
};

As template parameter:

template<typename T>
struct Check2
{
   template<typename U = T, typename std::enable_if<
            std::is_same<U, int>::value, int>::type = 0>
   U read() { return 42; }

   template<typename U = T, typename std::enable_if<
            std::is_same<U, double>::value, int>::type = 0>
   U read() { return 3.14; }   
};

As return type:

template<typename T>
struct Check3
{
   template<typename U = T>
   typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<U, int>::value, U>::type read() {
      return 42;
   }

   template<typename U = T>
   typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<U, double>::value, U>::type read() {
      return 3.14;
   }   
};
  • Which solution should be prefered and why should I avoid others?
  • In which cases "Avoid std::enable_if in function signatures" concerns usage as return type (which is not part of normal function signature but of template specializations)?
  • Are there any differences for member and non-member function templates?
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Because overloading is just as nice, usually. If anything, delegate to an implementation that uses (specialized) class templates. –  sehe Jan 30 '13 at 9:09
    
Member functions differ in that the overload set includes overloads declared after the current overload. This is particularly important when doing variadics delayed return type (where the return type is to be inferred from another overload) –  sehe Jan 30 '13 at 9:11
1  
Well, merely subjectively I have to say that while often being quite useful I don't like std::enable_if to clutter my function signatures (especially the ugly additional nullptr function argument version) because it always looks like what it is, a strange hack (for something a static if might do much more beautiful and clean) using template black-magic to exploit an interresting language feature. This is why I prefer tag-dispatching whenever possible (well, you still have additional strange arguments, but not in the public interface and also much less ugly and cryptic). –  Christian Rau Jan 30 '13 at 10:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Put the hack in the template parameters.

The enable_if on template parameter approach has at least two advantages over the others:

  • readability: the enable_if use and the return/argument types are not merged together into one messy chunk of typename disambiguators and nested type accesses; even though the clutter of the disambiguator and nested type can be mitigated with alias templates, that would still merge two unrelated things together. The enable_if use is related to the template parameters not to the return types. Having them in the template parameters means they are closer to what matters;

  • universal applicability: constructors don't have return types, and some operators cannot have extra arguments, so neither of the other two options can be applied everywhere. Putting enable_if in a template parameter works everywhere since you can only use SFINAE on templates anyway.

For me, the readability aspect is the big motivating factor in this choice.

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2  
You can also make it even more readable with alias templates and some tuning: flamingdangerzone.com/cxx11/2012/06/01/almost-static-if.html –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 31 '13 at 10:50
    
Using the FUNCTION_REQUIRES macro here, makes it much nicer to read, and it works in C++03 compilers as well, and it relies on using enable_if in the return type. Also, using enable_if in function template parameters causes problems for overloading, because now the function signature aren't unique causing ambiguous overloading errors. –  Paul Mar 3 '13 at 17:05

std::enable_if relies on the "Substition Failure Is Not An Error" (aka SFINAE) principle during template argument deduction. This is a very fragile language feature and you need to be very careful to get it right.

  1. if your condition inside the enable_if contains a nested template or type definition (hint: look for :: tokens), then the resolution of these nested tempatles or types are usually a non-deduced context. Any substitution failure on such a non-deduced context is an error.
  2. the various conditions in multiple enable_if overloads cannot have any overlap because of the One Definition Rule (ODR). This is something that you as an author need to check yourself.
  3. enable_if manipulates the set of viable functions during overload resolution which can have surprising interactions depending on the presence of other functions that are brought in from other scopes (e.g. through ADL). This makes it not very robust.

In short, when it works it works, but when it doesn't it can be very hard to debug. A very good alternative is to use tag dispatching, i.e. to delegate to an implementation function (usually in a detail namespace or in a helper class) that receives a dummy argument based on the same compile-time condition that you use in the enable_if.

template<typename T>
T fun(T arg) 
{ 
    return detail::fun(arg, typename some_template_trait<T>::type() ); 
}

namespace detail {
    template<typename T>
    fun(T arg, std::false_type /* dummy */) { }

    template<typename T>
    fun(T arg, std::true_type /* dummy */) {}
}

Tag dispatching does not manipulate the overload set, but helps you select exactly the function you want by providing the proper arguments through a compile-time expression (e.g. in a type trait). In my experience, this is much easier to debug and get right. If you are an aspiring library writer of sophisticated type traits, you might need enable_if somehow, but for most regular use of compile-time conditions it's not recommended.

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8  
Tag dispatching has one disadvantage though: if you have some trait that detects the presence of a function, and that function is implemented with the tag dispatching approach, it always report that member as present, and result in an error instead of a potential substitution failure. SFINAE is primarily a technique for removing overloads from candidate sets, and tag dispatching is a technique for selecting between two (or more) overloads. There is some overlap in functionality, but they are not equivalent. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 30 '13 at 9:40
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes can you give a short example, and illustrate how enable_if would get it right? –  TemplateRex Jan 30 '13 at 9:44
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes I updated my answer to reflect your comment a bit, tnx. –  TemplateRex Jan 30 '13 at 9:50
    
Short? Sorry :( Imagine you implement a function f as a template for all types in that fulfill some condition and not for other types. If you use tag dispatching, you won't have a false_type overload. That's fine, it causes an error when you try to use that op>> for the wrong types. You don't even need tag dispatching for this, you could just use static_assert and give better error messages. (to be continued) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 30 '13 at 10:03
1  
@R.MartinhoFernandes I think a separate answer explaining these points might add value to the OP. :-) BTW, writing traits like is_f_able is something that I consider a task for library writers who can of course use SFINAE when that gives them an advantage, but for "regular" users and given a trait is_f_able, I think tag dispatching is easier. –  TemplateRex Jan 30 '13 at 10:09

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