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I am trying to make a program, that displays rather large numbers (BigInteger large). To make it easier for the user, I am displaying the numbers as string (1 000 000 = 1 Million). My below code shows my current attempt. My problem lies, in the fact that the actual number that I am replacing will not be nice and round. This program does not need to display the 100% accurate value, rather give a ball park figure. I.E:

1 234 567 = 1 Million
1 000 000 = 1 Million
1 934 234 = 1 Million

My current code (Shortened for brevity):

            if (!displayNumbers) {
                StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(_combinations);
                String t = sb.reverse().toString();

                Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), t, 1).show();

                ...

                if (t.contains("000 000 000 000 000")) {
                    t.replace("000 000 000 000 000", "quadrillion");
                }

                if (t.contains("000 000 000 000")) {
                    t.replace("000 000 000 000", "trillion");
                }

                if (t.contains("000 000 000")) {
                    t.replace("000 000 000", "billion");
                }

                if (t.contains("000 000")) {
                    t.replace("000 000", "million");
                }

                sb = new StringBuffer(t);
                _combinations = sb.reverse().toString();
            }

I was thinking something along the lines of replacing the zero's with #'s so that it would just search for x lots of 3 digits and replace with corresponding word, but I do not know how to implement this. I should also note that I am aware that the million, billion, etc are currently spelt backwards in the final output string.

EDIT: Should note for UK readers that I am using USA definitions of *illions.

EDIT 2: Been doing some more Googling and found this - java Regex: replace all numerical values with one number. Except I have no idea how to modify the Regex for finding 000 000.

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Are your numbers embedded in some large text? Or you are having just that content in your t string? –  Rohit Jain Jan 30 '13 at 9:41
    
Just that content. It's displaying high powers E.G. (12312452355^170). And 'Hi' again. You helped a lot on my last question :D –  Asryael Jan 30 '13 at 9:43
    
@Asryael.. You mean you have numbers in the form of powers also? –  Rohit Jain Jan 30 '13 at 9:45
    
No, its displaying the answer of high powers t = (12312452355^170).toString(); (Psuedo code obviously) –  Asryael Jan 30 '13 at 9:47
1  
If you look for just zeros, you won't be able to do e.g. 1 234 567 = 1 Million. Why not just count the integer digits? –  MikeM Jan 30 '13 at 9:47

5 Answers 5

you can do that using if and else statements, from what I understand you're not looking for exact representation , so it is ok to say 1 Million for 1400000. To do so you can use code like this:

int myValue
String txt = null;
if (myValue> 500 000 000){
       txt = String.ValueOf((int) myValue/1000000000) + " Billion"
} else if (myValue> 500 000){
       txt = String.ValueOf((int) myValue/1000000) + " Million"
} else if (myValue> 500) {
       txt = String.ValueOf((int) myValue/1000) + " Thousand"
} 

This should work for the simple usage you're describing.

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Except for when the value of myValue gets higher then 2^(32-1). Hence the BigIntegers :D –  Asryael Jan 30 '13 at 9:51
    
Yes the same apply to BigInteger , I'm just proposing an idea not implementation –  Mr.Me Jan 30 '13 at 10:06
    
Okay, but better as e.g. txt = Math.round(myValue/1e6) + " Million"; and 500 000 000 is invalid, and could be 5e8. Otherwise, looks good. –  MikeM Jan 30 '13 at 10:27

Your number(in text) is just for display purpose. It's bad idea to manipulate numbers after converting them to string.

Why don't you just parse the text to integer and format it with a proper way for display. Here is a example you should take a look

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would like to thank everyone else for their help with suggestions on how to fix this, and I am sure that they are all possible. However, I found that the best way, was to still convert the BigInteger to string, but not to add whitespace.

If the string's length was less than 6 I left it as it was and simply added whitespace for looks. If it was longer then 6, I took the first 1, 2 or 3 numbers depending on the Mod of the string's length and used them as actual numbers to show at the start (1 Million, 34 Billion, 124 Quadrillion, etc).

This was then followed by seeing how long the remaining string was, and simply adding more string to the display text if it was longer then a certain amount.

If anyone needs clarification of this, please do not hesitate to ask me! Here is the link to the pastebin - http://pastebin.com/3X681UkG

Good luck!

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Example implementation that rounds numbers over one thousand to one significant figure.

Optionally, groups of three digits may be separated by comma or space.

private final static String[] illions = { 
    "m", "b", "tr", "quadr", "quint", "sext", "sept", "oct", "non", "dec",
    "undec", "duodec", "tredec", "quattuordec", "quindec", "sexdec",
    "septendec", "octodec", "novemdec", "vigint", "unvigint", "duovigint", 
    "trevigint", "quattuorvigint", "quinvigint", "sexvigint", "septenvigint",
    "octovigint", "novemvigint", "trigint", "untrigint", "duotrigint" 
};

private static String approximate( String n ) {  
    String approx = n;

    if ( n != null && n.matches( "^\\d{1,3}[\\s,]?(\\d{3}[\\s,]?)*\\d{3}$" ) ) {  
        n = n.replaceAll( "[\\s,]", "" );            
        int i = n.length() + 2;

        if ( i < 105 ) {
            int rnd = (int) Math.round( Double.parseDouble( n.substring( 0, 2 ) ) / 10 )
                    * (int) Math.pow(10, i % 3);
            n = i > 8 ? illions[ i / 3 - 3 ] + "illion" : "thousand";   
            approx = rnd  + " " + n;
        }
    }

    return approx;
}

Test

System.out.printf("%s\n%s\n%s\n%s\n%s\n%s\n%s\n%s\n%s\n%s\n%s\n%s\n%s\n%s",
    approximate("999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999"),  // "1000 duotrigintillion"    
    approximate("4857476486598746598743265987426598724365987265987324598726598734625987564987456"),  // "5 quinvigintillion"
    approximate("56843584275874587243582837465847326554"),  // "60 undecillion"
    approximate("1 345 678 910 111 213"),                   // "1 quadrillion"
    approximate("47,648,658,437,651"),                      // "50 trillion"
    approximate("9 891 011 123"),                           // "10 billion"
    approximate("687654321"),                               // "700 million"
    approximate("32 456 999"),                              // "30 million"
    approximate("2,678,910"),                               // "3 million"
    approximate("1 234 567"),                               // "1 million"
    approximate("123456"),                                  // "100 thousand"
    approximate("17,654"),                                  // "20 thousand"
    approximate("8765"),                                    // "9 thousand"
    approximate("654")                                      // "654"
);      
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I would just simply count digits. rough code from scratch:

String result = "";
Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("[\\s0-9]+");
Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(t);
int index = 0;
while (matcher.find()) {
    int newIndex = matcher.start();
    result += t.substring(index, newIndex);
    result += convert(matcher.group());

    index = matcher.end() + 1;
}

result += t.substring(index, t.length() - 1);


private String convert(String uglyNumber) {

    // get rid of whitespaces
    String number = uglyNumber.replace("\\s", "");

    // simply count digits
    if( 6 < number.length() && number.length() <= 9 ) {
    return "million";
    } else if( 9 < number.length() && number.length() <= 12 ) {
        return "million";
    } else ...

    return ulgyNumber;
}

if numbers are more compilcated than simple mix of digits and whitespaces, you may want to have a look for this regex site:

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