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I have been wondering for some time whether it is allowable within best practice to refrain from using the containsKey() method on java.util.Map and instead do a null check on the result from get().

My rationale is that it seems redundant to do the lookup of the value twice - first for the containsKey() and then again for get().

On the other hand it may be that most standard implementations of Map cache the last lookup or that the compiler can otherwise do away with the redundancy, and that for readability of the code it is preferable to maintain the containsKey() part.

I would much appreciate your comments.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Some Map implementations are allowed to have null values, eg HashMap, in this case if get(key) returns null it does not guarantee that there is no entry in the map associatied with this key.

So if you want to know if a map contains a key use Map.containsKey. If you simply need a value mapped to a key use Map.get(key), Map.containsKey will be useless and will affect performance. Moreover, in case of concurrent access to a map (eg ConcurrentHashMap), after you tested Map.containsKey(key) there is chance that the entry will removed by another thread before you call Map.get(key)

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5  
Even if the value is set to null, do you want to treat that differently to a key/value which is not set? If you don't specifically need to treat it differently, you can just use get() –  Peter Lawrey Jan 30 '13 at 10:51
1  
If your Map is private, your class might be able to guarantee a null is never inserted in the map. In that case, you could use get() followed by a check for null instead of containsKey(). Doing so can be clearer, and perhaps a little more efficient, in some cases. –  Raedwald Feb 1 '13 at 12:55

I think it is fairly standard to write:

Object value = map.get(key);
if (value != null) {
    //do something with value
}

instead of

if (map.containsKey(key)) {
    Object value = map.get(key);
    //do something with value
}

It is not less readable and slightly more efficient so I don't see any reasons not to do it. Obviously if your map can contain null, the two options don't have the same semantics.

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As assylias indicated, this is a semantic question. Generally, Map.get(x) == null is what you want, but there are cases where it is important to use containsKey.

One such case is a cache. I once worked on a performance issue in a web app that was querying its database frequently looking for entities that didn't exist. When I studied the caching code for that component, I realized it was querying the database if cache.get(key) == null. If the database returned null (entity not found), we would cache that key -> null mapping.

Switching to containsKey solved the problem because a mapping to a null value actually meant something. The key mapping to null had a different semantic meaning than the key not existing.

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