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For a sequence of n distinct elements, like for example {0, 1, 2, ..., n-1}, where n is even, it is possible to identify n permutations of the sequence that are completely dissimilar from each other. If n is odd, then it is possible to identify n-1 such permutations. Note, this is just a claim and not yet a fact.

By completely dissimilar (which might not be accurate), I mean that there is no "adjacent and ordered pair" of elements, like (0,1), (2,3) and (n-3, n-2), from a certain permutation that repeats in any of the remaining permutations.

For example:

If n=2, then we can identify {0, 1} and {1, 0} as two completely dissimilar permutations.

If n=3, then we can identify {0, 1, 2} and {2, 1, 0} as two completely dissimilar permutations.

If n=4, then we can identify {0, 1, 2, 3}, {1, 3, 0, 2}, {2, 0, 3, 1} and {3, 2, 1, 0} as four completely dissimilar permutations.

If n=5, then we can identify {0, 1, 2, 3, 4}, {1, 4, 2, 0, 3}, {3, 0, 2, 4, 1}, {4, 3, 2, 1, 0} as four completely dissimilar permutations.

I will like to know:

1) Is there a general rule or algorithm to find, given a sequence, any n (if n is even) or n-1 (if n is odd) completely dissimilar permutations of that sequence?

2) Is there a formal definition of this problem?

share|improve this question
    
Do you mean "sets of dissimilar permutations" ? For example, <{0,1,2}, {1,0,2}> would qualify as well, if I understand your definition. And then you would be looking for maximal such sets, i.e. set of maximum size with mutually dissimilar permutations. Is it what you mean ? –  Jean-Claude Arbaut Jan 31 '13 at 3:52
1  
@arbautjc: Yes, that understanding applies very well. I used <{0,1,2}, {2,1,0}> instead so to put in some pattern! I emphasized on a number of n (or n-1) of such permutations because I think that is the maximum. –  yemelitc Jan 31 '13 at 6:22

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