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I have recently started trying to use more javascript and a slightly more OO style of programming when using it. I am struggling to grasp a couple of concepts which are probably quite basic and so I wondered if someone could help me out.

Below is a snippet of code I lifted from Stack Overflow which I am using as an example:

var Person = (function () {
             // private static
             var nextId = 1;

                // constructor
                var cls = function () {
                    // private
                    var id = nextId++;
                    var name = 'Unknown';

                    // public (this instance only)
                    this.get_id = function () { return id; };

                    this.get_name = function () { return name; };
                    this.set_name = function (value) {
                            if (typeof value != 'string')
                                    throw 'Name must be a string';
                            if (value.length < 2 || value.length > 20)
                                    throw 'Name must be 2-20 characters long.';
                            name = value;
                    };
                };

                // public static
                cls.get_nextId = function () {
                    return nextId;
                };

                // public (shared across instances)
                cls.prototype = {
                                announce: function () {
                                    alert('My id is ' + this.get_id() + ' and my name is "' + this.get_name() + '"\r\n' +
                                    'The next id will be ' + Person.get_nextId());
                                }
                };

                return cls;
        })();

I have a couple of questions all related to this snippet of code:

1) What does the double sets of round brackets indicate var Person =(function(){...})();

2) How is it that the variable nextId is static and isnt recreated each time a Person object is created? Is there some sort of Object caching in javascript (like a loaded class)?

3) Is the Person Object actually a cls object if I create it using new Person() as that is what's returned from the function?

4) If I am creating objects in this way is there any point in attaching methods to the prototype as I could just declare the announce function inside the cls object and all instances would have it anyway wouldnt they?

5) Inside the cls function what does 'this' actually refer to? Is it a newly created object that is being returned from within this function itself at the line 'return cls;'?

These questions are quite basic but OO in javascript is really confusing for me! I do normally program in an object oriented style but in java it just seems to make more sense...

Thanks

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closed as not constructive by Felix Kling, Sindre Sorhus, Frank van Puffelen, SztupY, Bohemian Jan 30 '13 at 14:21

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1. It is an self executing anonymous function –  Arun P Johny Jan 30 '13 at 10:34
    
3. yes person is an object of type cls –  Arun P Johny Jan 30 '13 at 10:36
    
If you are serious about doing JavaScript + OOP I would recommend not adapting such pattern. John Resigs Simple JavaScript Inheritance is way better. –  bikeshedder Jan 30 '13 at 10:45
    
Take a look at this answer. If you're familiar with other object oriented languages like C++ then this should be a breeze for you: stackoverflow.com/a/14544841/783743 –  Aadit M Shah Jan 30 '13 at 11:38

1 Answer 1

1) What does the double sets of round brackets indicate var Person =(function(){...})();

This is a function which is executed right ahead. It keeps local variables inside the function from being declared at the global scope.

Example:

tmp = function() { CODE };
tmp()

... is basicly the same as ...

(function() { CODE })();

You just need extra () around the function as it is a syntax error otherwise.

2) How is it that the variable nextId is static and isn't recreated each time a Person object is created? Is there some sort of Object caching in javascript (like a loaded class)?

Since nextId is created inside the function scope (see 1) it is always the same variable when being accessed from the code.

3) Is the Person Object actually a cls object if I create it using new Person() as that is what's returned from the function?

The function (see 1) returns the cls which is created inside. So yes, Person and cls are effectively the same thing.

4) If I am creating objects in this way is there any point in attaching methods to the prototype as I could just declare the announce function inside the cls object and all instances would have it anyway wouldnt they?

The difference is that the prototype is shared among all instances while adding them in the constructor is basicly a copy. Using prototypes is faster and also more memory efficient.

5) Inside the cls function what does 'this' actually refer to? Is it a newly created object that is being returned from within this function itself at the line 'return cls;'?

No. When calling new Person() you are effectively calling new cls(). New creates a new object and calls the function with this set to the object. Thus this inside the cls function is the actual object instance you are creating.


By the way. If you really want to do some OOP programming with JavaScript I'd recommend using the excellent code snippet from JohnResig: http://ejohn.org/blog/simple-javascript-inheritance/

share|improve this answer
    
I slightly modified my answer to 1 and added an example code snippet. Please read Nested functions and closures from the MDN. This explains it very well. –  bikeshedder Jan 30 '13 at 11:21
    
Hi, yes thats why I deleted my previous comment as your redefinition of answer one was really helpful and made the majority of pmy previous post pointless! –  berimbolo Jan 30 '13 at 11:24
    
Thanks for the link to Nested Functions and Closures, I see now that the inner function inherits the variables defined in the scope of the outer function. Please correct me if I am wrong, otherwise I think I understand everything now. –  berimbolo Jan 30 '13 at 11:27
    
Good answer, but I have to disagree on the last sentence. 1) OOP !== class-based inheritance 2) You should understand the workings (internals?) of JS first before using such helpers. –  Bergi Jan 30 '13 at 11:30
    
In JavaScript returning from a function does not necessarily mean that the variables are released. As long as any object or function holds a reference to a variable the variable continues to live. –  bikeshedder Jan 30 '13 at 11:31

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