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I have the following structure from a library:

typedef struct
{
    unsigned char pin;              //!< Module pin.
    unsigned char function;         //!< Module function.
} gpio_map_t[]; 

now, in my code I create an instance of the structure like that:

gpio_map_t display_spi_pins = {
        {1,1},
        {2,2},
        {3,3},
        {4,4}
    };

and then i create a pointer like that:

gpio_map_t* spi_pins_pointer = &display_spi_pins;

until here everythings goes well, no compilation error.

I would like to know how I get back the reference to display_spi_pins. I try like that:

gpio_map_t display_spi_pins_new_reference = *spi_pins_pointer;

but I get a compilation error saying:

array initializer must be an initializer list

Edit: Dont forget that typedef sctruct... is comming from a library, I can not modify it.

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being C you can use the flexibility of being able to cast almost anything to something else. So in your case you could create another struct/typedef but with same memory layour and where you leave out the []. Then you could cast your existing array to it. That will be a workaround. It is not a good practice to embedd a [] in a typedef as you see, it makes it less flexible. –  Claptrap Jan 30 '13 at 11:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Don't declare the type alias gpio_map_t as an array type. Instead when need an array of the structure, then declare the variable as an array, and use pointers only for references.

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the struct is comming from a library, I can not modify it –  ojota84 Jan 30 '13 at 10:43
2  
@ojota Then you have no choice, you can't use plain non-pointer gpio_map_t other than to create a compile-time array. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 30 '13 at 10:46
    
Why? if i can get the pointer to the structure, why i can not get back the reference –  ojota84 Jan 30 '13 at 10:52
4  
@ojota Pointers and arrays are similar, and an array can be used as a pointer (and a pointer can be indexed like an array) but arrays have some extra data during compilation that a pointer do not have, like for example the size. The pointer doesn't have that extra data, so the compiler can't create a new array from the pointer. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 30 '13 at 10:55
2  
@ojota, simply use function(display_spi_pins); - I bet it's gonna work, you do not even need pointers or references in this case. –  KBart Jan 30 '13 at 12:23

The problem is you're defining gpio_map_t as an array of structs whose length is undefined. Do something like that instead :

typedef struct
{
    unsigned char pin;              //!< Module pin.
    unsigned char function;         //!< Module function.
} gpio_map_t;

gpio_map_t[] display_spi_pins = {
    {1,1},
    {2,2},
    {3,3},
    {4,4}
};

gpio_map_t** spi_pins_pointer = &display_spi_pins;
gpio_map_t* display_spi_pins_new_reference = *spi_pins_pointer;

(Remember that a gpio_map_t* is quite close to a gpio_map_t[]).

share|improve this answer
    
please take into account that the structure is comming from the library, and actually it works well, and there is no problem with the initialization, only when getting back the reference –  ojota84 Jan 30 '13 at 10:50

You can not access data via pointer in this case you can access to it directly with your array display_spi_pins

for(i=0; i<sizeof(display_spi_pins)/sizeof(display_spi_pins[0]); i++) {
    printf("pin[%d]=%X, function[%d]=%X\n",
           i, display_spi_pins[i].pin,
           i, display_spi_pins[i].function);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The error I get it in the last line. If i do it like you say, I get an additional error: array has incomplete element type 'gpio_map_t' –  ojota84 Jan 30 '13 at 10:42
    
@ojota Answer updated –  MOHAMED Jan 30 '13 at 10:45
    
As I said to Joachim, I can not modify the struct, it is inside the library –  ojota84 Jan 30 '13 at 10:46
    
@ojota In that case you can access directelly with your display_spi_pins array. Answer updated –  MOHAMED Jan 30 '13 at 11:05
    
the problem is I have no more access to my array where I need it, I have only my pointer :( –  ojota84 Jan 30 '13 at 11:09

Is this what you are looking for:

typedef struct
{
    unsigned char pin;              //!< Module pin.
    unsigned char function;         //!< Module function.
} gpio_map_t[]; 


void main()
{
    gpio_map_t display_spi_pins = {{1,1}, {2,2}, {3,3}, {5,6}};
    gpio_map_t* spi_pins_pointer = &display_spi_pins;
    gpio_map_t* display_spi_pins_new_reference = spi_pins_pointer;

    int i;    

    for(i=0;i<4;i++){
        printf("%d: %d  %d\n",i,(display_spi_pins+i)->pin,(display_spi_pins+i)->function);

        if(((display_spi_pins+i)->pin != (*spi_pins_pointer+i)->pin) ||
            ((display_spi_pins+i)->pin != (*display_spi_pins_new_reference+i)->pin) ||
            ((display_spi_pins+i)->function != (*spi_pins_pointer+i)->function) ||
            ((display_spi_pins+i)->function != (*display_spi_pins_new_reference+i)->function))  
            printf("Reference ERROR\n");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You simply dublicated spi_pins_pointer as display_spi_pins_new_reference. The point is to get original structure back, not just a pointer. –  KBart Jan 31 '13 at 7:13

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