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In Oracle 11g when PL/SQL context finishing function/procedure automatically close opened cursors. Why in many examples over the web users opening and closing their cursors?

Is this backward compatibility ?

What about REF-CURSORs ? Leaving procedure close them also ?

If cursor should be closed always what about handling exceptions? In EXCEPTION block do I have to check all cursors ISOPEN and then close them?

Basic script demonstrates auto-closing feature:

DECLARE
  PROCEDURE TEST IS
    CURSOR CUR_CLIENTS IS SELECT DUMMY CL_ID FROM DUAL;
    TYPE RT_CLIENTS IS TABLE OF CUR_CLIENTS%ROWTYPE;
    LT_CLIENTS RT_CLIENTS;
  BEGIN
    IF CUR_CLIENTS%ISOPEN THEN
      DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('CLOSING CURSOR');
      CLOSE CUR_CLIENTS;
    END IF;
    OPEN CUR_CLIENTS;
    LOOP
      FETCH CUR_CLIENTS BULK COLLECT INTO LT_CLIENTS LIMIT 1000;
      EXIT WHEN LT_CLIENTS.COUNT = 0;
      FOR I IN 1..LT_CLIENTS.COUNT LOOP
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(LT_CLIENTS(I).CL_ID);
      END LOOP;
    END LOOP;
  END TEST;
BEGIN
  DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('--------------------');
  TEST;
  DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('--------------------');
  TEST;
  DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('--------------------');
  TEST;
  DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('--------------------');
END;
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1  
always close the cursor below the loop to avoid chance of going overuse of process, not that its gonna influence in the final result anyway...its just a good practice –  Toping Jan 30 '13 at 13:19
    
@Ark GOOD practice advices is always welcome so +1 from me –  WBAR Jan 30 '13 at 13:39
    
So you did the test, why not accept the result of auto-closing? –  Plouf Jan 30 '13 at 17:18
    
OPEN/FETCH/CLOSE is a bad idea Just use implicit cursors; they run as fast or faster, and are easier to code and understand. –  Jon Heller Feb 1 '13 at 5:14
1  
@jonearles No, Many cases We have necessary to use Explicit cursor. This is nonsense answer. –  Sanjaya Pandey Feb 2 '13 at 12:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your script, you are doing wrong because You are checking the cursor is opened or not, you are closing it if it is already opened, and again re-opened. If cursor is already opened then Do Not close it , just use it.

In plsql, cursors opened within the inner block have obviously not been implicitly closed. Had they been closed, I would not have exceeded the maximum number of open cursors.


In my experience:

SQL> DECLARE    
  2     CURSOR last99 IS SELECT * FROM dual;    
  3  BEGIN
  4    DECLARE    
  5       CURSOR test01 IS SELECT * FROM dual;
  6       CURSOR test02 IS SELECT * FROM dual;    
  7       CURSOR test03 IS SELECT * FROM dual;    
............................    
............................    
 51       CURSOR test47 IS SELECT * FROM dual;    
 52       CURSOR test48 IS SELECT * FROM dual;    
 53    BEGIN    
 54       OPEN test01;    
 55       OPEN test02;    
 56       OPEN test03;   

 ..............    
...............   

 99       OPEN test46;    
100       OPEN test47;  
101       OPEN test48;    
102    END;    
104    --This last OPEN will cause an error     
105    --from too many cursors.    
106    OPEN last99;    
107  END;    
108  /    
DECLARE    
*    
ERROR at line 1:    
ORA-01000: maximum open cursors exceeded    
ORA-06512: at line 2    
ORA-06512: at line 106 

You can close cursor in Exception block also.

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