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I have dates in the format 20Jan2013, 08Aug2012 etc, with their own specific timezones. So for example, 20Jan2013 might have a timezone ID of Australia/Melbourne, and 08Aug2012 might have an ID of Europe/London. What I want to do is, based on these timezones and the dates, calculate the UTC offset for that timezone on the given date. I've come up with this so far:

DateTimeFormatter dtf = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("ZZ");
DateTimeFormatter dtf1 = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("ddMMMYYYY");

DateTimeZone zone = DateTimeZone.forID("Australia/Melbourne");  

DateTime thisDate = dtf1.parseDateTime("30Jul2013");                                            
System.out.println("\nZone: " + thisDate.withZone(zone));

This gives me the output:

Zone: 2013-07-30T00:00:00.000+10:00

This is correct, but I would like to extract just the UTC offset from this, which in this case is +10:00. I've looked for ways to do this but can't find anything. Is there any way I can do this? The only option I see is to convert the output to a String and use the substring method to get the UTC offset.

The above code does take DST (Daylight Saving Time) into account. So for example if I had: DateTime thisDate = dtf1.parseDateTime("30Jan2013");

The output would be: 2013-01-30T00:00:00.000+11:00

(+11:00 at the end instead of +10:00)

So basically all I need to do is find a way to extract +11:00 from 2013-07-30T00:00:00.000+11:00. Please help!

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2 Answers

Simple Method for Obtaining Timezone Name and Offset in Hours

public static String getCurrentTimeZoneOffset() {
    DateTimeZone tz = DateTimeZone.getDefault();
    Long instant = DateTime.now().getMillis();

    String name = tz.getName(instant);

    long offsetInMilliseconds = tz.getOffset(instant);
    long hours = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours( offsetInMilliseconds );
    String offset = Long.toString( hours );

    return name + " (" + offset + " Hours)";
    // Example: "Mountain Standard Time (-7 Hours)"
}

Couple caveats:

  • This gets the default DateTimeZone from JodaTime. You can modify it to accept a specific DateTimeZone that is passed into the method.
  • This returns it in a format like "Mountain Standard Time (-7 Hours)" but you can format it as you see fit fairly easily.

Hope that helps.

JP

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If you just need the timezone offset, use DateTimeZone.forID() to get the time zone and then tz.getOffset(instant) to get the offset to UTC in milliseconds.

It may look odd that you need an instant to calculate the offset to UTC but this is necessary to take Daylight Savings into account as well as changes in the timezone. Yes, countries change their timezones once in a while:

Why does timezone data change?

Timezone settings are adopted locally, and there is no world timezone authority.

EDIT This gives you the correct result:

    DateTimeFormatter dtf1 = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("ddMMMYYYY");

    DateTimeZone zone = DateTimeZone.forID("Australia/Melbourne");  

    DateTime thisDate = dtf1.parseDateTime("30Jul2013").withZone(zone);                                            
    assertEquals( 10 * CommonConstants.MILLISECONDS_PER_HOUR,
        zone.getOffset( thisDate ) );

thisDate.get

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Sorry forgot to mention that the above code does take DST (Daylight Saving Time) into account. So for example if I had: DateTime thisDate = dtf1.parseDateTime("30Feb2013"); The output would be: 2013-07-30T00:00:00.000+11:00 (+11:00 at the end instead of +10:00) –  PrincessBelle Jan 30 '13 at 11:34
    
Sorry about how does the below code work? assertEquals( 10 * CommonConstants.MILLISECONDS_PER_HOUR, zone.getOffset( thisDate ) ); It gives me an error for CommonConstants. Where are you getting it from? –  PrincessBelle Jan 30 '13 at 22:50
    
It's a class that I wrote which contains constants that I use all the time. The main purpose is to make the code readable. Don't you agree that it's easy for you to fix this? –  Aaron Digulla Jan 31 '13 at 8:20
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