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I am trying to create a table with the third Friday of the month for each month in the past year. I know how to do this for one month at a time but am having trouble in returning a range of dates instead. I have tried to do this using a for loop:

create table fridays as
begin
 for i in 1..365
   loop
     select next_day(trunc(sysdate - i,'MM')+13,'FRIDAY') third_friday 
  from dual
end loop;

Do I need to have an array to put these values into or am I going wrong somewhere else?

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For a create table ... as statement to work, you have to be using pure SQL (like A.B.Cade's solution below). Putting a begin ... end; block is PL/SQL which won't work. –  Chris Saxon Jan 30 '13 at 12:27
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Do you mean something like this?

select dt
  from (select dt,
               row_number() over(partition by to_char(dt, 'mm') order by dt) wn
          from (select trunc(sysdate, 'mm') - level dt
                  from dual
                connect by level < 365)
         where to_char(dt, 'd') = 6)
 where wn = 3

Here is a sqlfiddle demo


UPDATE In reference to @APC's comment:

If you don't want to rely on NLS_TERRITORY then you can do something like this:

select dt
  from (select dt,
               row_number() over(partition by to_char(dt, 'mm') order by dt) wn
          from (select trunc(sysdate, 'mm') - level dt
                  from dual
                connect by level < 365)
         where to_char(dt, 'dy', 'nls_date_language=AMERICAN') = 'fri')
 where wn = 3
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This solution deploys the data mask 'D'; day of the week varies with NLS_TERRITORY, so 6 might be Thursday or Saturday for other NLS settings. –  APC Jan 30 '13 at 12:38
    
@A.B.Cade thanks thats almost what I'm looking for. I want it to start looking from sysdate -1 so that the first entry should be the 18th January 2013. Also is this solution restricted to a one year range or could you extend it to say 5 years? –  alloemf Jan 30 '13 at 13:17
    
The year is generated by the level < 365. This is teh number of days in a (non-leap) year. To generate records for more years multiple 365 by the required degree. –  APC Jan 30 '13 at 13:37
    
Thank @APC for your comment –  A.B.Cade Jan 31 '13 at 7:24
    
@alloemf, if you want to include the cuurent month then change trunc(sysdate, 'mm') to trunc(last_day(sysdate)) see demo here sqlfiddle.com/#!4/d41d8/6722 –  A.B.Cade Jan 31 '13 at 7:35
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Here's a slightly clunky but mostly intuitive method:

select next_day(
         next_day(
           next_day(
             add_months(date '2000-01-01',rownum-1)-1,
             'THURSDAY'),
           'THURSDAY'),
       'THURSDAY')
from    dual
connect by level <= 12
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If the first day of the month is itself a Thursday I think this solution will deliver the fourth Thursday. –  APC Jan 30 '13 at 12:41
    
I think it's OK -- I subtract one day from the add_months() result so that it's finding the third occurence after the last day of the previous month. –  David Aldridge Jan 30 '13 at 13:17
    
Ah yes you're right. I missed that detail. –  APC Jan 30 '13 at 13:34
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One handy technique for these tricky relative date issues is to use DBMS_Schedular calendaring syntax, which I wrote about here and here.

DBMS_Scheduler has a very comprehensive calendaring syntax that is well suited to complex calendar specifications (once you get used to it), and the Evaluate_Calendar_String function returns the next timestamp that meets a schedule specification after a supplied date.

Here's code:

    create or replace type timestamp_table_type
    is
    table of timestamp;
    /

    create or replace function
     list_of_dates (
       calendar_string varchar2,
       start_date      TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE,
       stop_date       TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE)
    return
      timestamp_table_type
    pipelined
    is
      l_return_date_after TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE := start_date - interval '1' second;
      l_next_run_date     TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE;
    begin
      loop
        DBMS_SCHEDULER.EVALUATE_CALENDAR_STRING(  
          calendar_string   => list_of_dates.calendar_string,
          start_date        => list_of_dates.start_date,
          return_date_after => l_return_date_after,
          next_run_date     => l_next_run_date);
          exit when list_of_dates.l_next_run_date > coalesce(list_of_dates.stop_date,date '9999-12-31');
          pipe row (list_of_dates.l_next_run_date);
          list_of_dates.l_return_date_after    := list_of_dates.l_next_run_date;
     end loop;
    end;
    /

I think that the third Friday of every month would be:

    begin
     dbms_scheduler.create_schedule(
     schedule_name => 'THIRD_THU_OF_EVERY_MONTH',
     repeat_interval => 'FREQ=MONTHLY;BYDAY=5;BYSETPOS=3');
    end;
    /

    select *
    from   table(
      list_of_dates(
        'THIRD_THU_OF_EVERY_MONTH',
        sysdate    ,
        null));

I'm afraid I don't have an Oracle system handy to test this with, unfortunately.

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Here's another one:

Select Months, Last_Fri, Total_Fridays
    , (CASE WHEN Total_Fridays = 4 THEN Last_Fri-7 ELSE Last_Fri-14 END) third_fri
 From
 (
  Select To_Char(dt,'Month') Months
       , Next_Day(Last_Day(dt),'FRI')-7 Last_Fri
      , Ceil(to_number(to_char(next_day(last_day(dt)-7,'FRI'),'DD'))/7) Total_Fridays
   From 
 (
  Select add_months(trunc(sysdate,'YEAR'),level-1) dt
   From dual
 Connect By Level <= 12
 ))
/

SQL>
MONTHS  LAST_FRI    TOTAL_FRIDAYS   THIRD_FRI
--------------------------------------------------
January     1/25/2013   4   1/18/2013
February    2/22/2013   4   2/15/2013
March       3/29/2013   5   3/15/2013
April       4/26/2013   4   4/19/2013
May         5/31/2013   5   5/17/2013
June        6/28/2013   4   6/21/2013
July        7/26/2013   4   7/19/2013
August      8/30/2013   5   8/16/2013
September   9/27/2013   4   9/20/2013
October     10/25/2013  4   10/18/2013
November    11/29/2013  5   11/15/2013
December    12/27/2013  4   12/20/2013
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