Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

At a point in my code, I expect current_part to sometimes be nil, and I want to run some code (inside an if block) when that's not the case.

Using script/server --debugger, I've established that current_part is in fact nil at that point when the following errors occur.

All the following versions generate the can't convert nil into String error on the second line:

#

  def map_concepts_to_part(part, current_part)
     if current_part
        part.concepts.map { |concept| content_tag(:li, "stuff...")}.join
      end
  end

#

  def map_concepts_to_part(part, current_part)
     if test_if_exists(current_part)
        part.concepts.map { |concept| content_tag(:li, "stuff...")}.join
      end
  end

  def test_if_exists(test_subject)
    test_subject rescue nil
  end

#

  def map_concepts_to_part(part, current_part)
     if test_if_complete(current_part)
        part.concepts.map { |concept| content_tag(:li, "stuff...")}.join
      end
  end

  def test_if_complete(test_subject)
    test_subject.id rescue nil
  end

#

  def test_if_complete(part, current_part)
     unless current_part.to_s == ""
        part.concepts.map { |concept| content_tag(:li, "stuff...")}.join
      end
  end

#

  def test_if_complete(part, current_part)
     unless current_part.nil?
        part.concepts.map { |concept| content_tag(:li, "stuff...")}.join
      end
  end

#

PS, the truncated line in each of the above is:

part.concepts.map { |concept| content_tag(:li, "Concept: “" + concept.title + "”", :class => "one_concept") + content_tag(:li, "Attached images (" + concept.images.size.to_s + ")", :class => "all_images") + content_tag(:li, "Attached docs (XX)", :class => "all_docs")}.join
share|improve this question
1  
Does it happen on that particular line, or is current_part actually a method that performs other operations in the background? –  tadman Sep 22 '09 at 14:18
    
current_path is a variable that is sometimes nil. def test_for_concepts(part, current_part) if current_part != nil map_concepts_to_part(part, current_part) end end –  steven_noble Sep 22 '09 at 14:29
    
hmmm... code doesn't format well in comments. Will use /// for line breaks. /// def test_for_concepts(part, current_part) /// if current_part != nil /// map_concepts_to_part(part, current_part) /// end /// end –  steven_noble Sep 22 '09 at 14:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The test current_part.to_s == "" returns true on my ruby system when current_part is nil. Unlike some other languages, you can say nil.to_s and nil.nil? and have them work. I think there is something else that is causing the problem. Can you show more of the code?

(My tests were in ruby 1.8.6)

Edit: Looking around, what usually causes the above error is an expression such as "text" + nil, not nil.to_s. Do you have anything like that around?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Kathy. I'm pretty sure I don't have anything like "text" + nil in the failing code. I've edited the entry above to provide extra detail. Should I provide more than this? Thanks again. –  steven_noble Sep 22 '09 at 22:02
    
Thanks all for your advice. I tried multiple versions of every suggestion without luck. After that, I restructured the code so if current_part doesn't exist, it never gets to this method in the first place. Less DRY -- as I've created very similar current_part and non-current_part methods -- but it passes my specs so I'm happy. Thanks again. –  steven_noble Sep 23 '09 at 12:08
1  
You are doing a lot of string summing in the map block. Are you certain none of them are nil? –  Kathy Van Stone Sep 23 '09 at 14:32

The problem is in your truncated line where concept.title meets the plus.

When you do

"Foo" + some_obj.some_attr

and some_attr in the object is nil, Ruby won't autocast it to string. Might happen often (!) since Rails casts NULL value in the DB to nils. Workarounds are in-string evaluation:

"Foo #{some_obj.attr_that_can_be_nil}"

pattern substitution (automatically truncates nil)

"Foo %s" % some_obj.attr_that_can_be_nil

or array joining (idem ditto)

["Foo ", some_obj.attr_that_can_be_nil].join

The reason you could not find it is that your "truncated line" deserves it's own 5-6 lines unwrapped properly, that way it would be much easier for you to spot the problem.

On a sidenote, you don't need “ and friends - just type it literally since Rails is UTF-8 nowadays anyway. Moreover, when passing stuff to tag helpers you might get this thing converted to “ which is totally not what you want (if helpers escape entities - I don't remember if they do, but Builder certainly does).

share|improve this answer

Tobias is right. You cannot access any member of the object if it is nil (as it does not exist). You must check for nil value before performing any operation or before accessing any member varible or function.

In cpp, is it like:

if(!current_part) { perform operation }

` This is a very common NPE(Null Pointer Exception) in almost every programming language.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Atul. I'm hoping to check for nil value first. I started with "unless current_part.nil" but got the "can't convert nil intro String" error. I tried "if current_part != nil" and "unless current_part == nil" and found the same. Funnily enough, "if current_part == nil" doesn't throw an error -- but of course it doesn't do what I want. As far as I'm aware, I'm using the correct Ruby syntax for checking if an object is nil? –  steven_noble Sep 22 '09 at 14:28
    
Have you found the solution to your problem yet? –  Atul Sep 23 '09 at 5:20

If the object is nil, then you can't use any of its member because the object itself does not exist. So the comparison should be of the object and nil, not a member of the object and nil.

It's like a null pointer exception.

You should use something like

x = get_some_object if x.nil?

to initialize the variable x if uninitialized.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tobias. unless current_part == "" doesn't throw an error. However, it also doesn't seem to be testing whether current_part is nil. Meanwhile, if current_part == "" throws a can't convert nil into String error –  steven_noble Sep 22 '09 at 14:14
    
Also Tobias, wouldn't "unless current_part.nil?" nonetheless work? In fact, I'm even getting a "can't convert nil intro String" error on "if current_part". –  steven_noble Sep 22 '09 at 14:19

Is that a local variable in some partial? if so, then even doing current_part.nil? will raise an error in case that variable is not passed to the partial.

to overcome this do:

counter_part = defined?(counter_part) ? : counter_part : nil

BTW: Normally, Ruby looks for an assignment statement to determine whether something is a variable—if a name hasn’t been assigned to, then Ruby assumes that name is a method call, so executing the following statement will raise an error if x wasn't initialized:

irb(main):001:0> puts "yes nil" if x.nil?
#=>NameError: undefined local variable or method `x' for main:Object
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.