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I have a set of data that looks like this:

col1  col2   col3   col4     cr
84  88.242  9.833   4.194     A
94  107.571 10.917  3.708     B
188 240.288 16.917  6.333     A
245 371.005 22.333  10.389    A
114 131.599 9.167   4.25      A
71  100.751 8.167   3         B
118 138.543 11.167  4.278     A
162 203.435 14.667  6.444     B
123 152.032 12.167  4.639     B
115 126.945 11.667  5.056     A
125 134.178 10      4.639     B
119 138.926 9.5     4.222     A
106 129.19  9.833   3.833     A
146 162.319 9.833   4.118     A

I've tried plotting the data using simple barplot command but its not giving the graph I actually want. I am looking to generate a plot of lets say 10 bars for each column (each bar would represent a range, for example 0-20, 20-40 and so on), having the X axis as the column values, the Y axis as % frequency (of A and B). A and B stacked in different colors (please note that the height of the bars has to be the same, since the Y axis is the % frequency).

This is what I am looking to generate

google_image_stacked_barplot

1 bar per column... any idea what command i should use for this.

(please ignore the axes names in the photo, it is just a photo i found on google, representing what i need)

Thanks,

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2  
(+1) However, it's always nice to show what you have done rather than saying, "I tried.. and it dint work". It gives a starting point (to find where the problem is and just work around it) and also the impression that you tried something. –  Arun Jan 30 '13 at 13:44
    
Hello Arun, actually there are many ways to do this. I did not want to specify 1 way I am thinking of. Now i have 2 different ways to get the plots :) Thanks for your comment –  Error404 Jan 30 '13 at 14:11
    
In spite of that, you'd get quite a few variants! :) (if you check some other posts here on SO, you'll get the idea. good luck. –  Arun Jan 30 '13 at 14:14
    
Well thank you :) –  Error404 Jan 30 '13 at 14:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Please try to post your data in an easy to copy-and-paste format, like I've done below:

mydata <- structure(list(col1 = c(84L, 94L, 188L, 245L, 114L, 71L, 118L, 
162L, 123L, 115L, 125L, 119L, 106L, 146L), col2 = c(88.242, 107.571, 
240.288, 371.005, 131.599, 100.751, 138.543, 203.435, 152.032, 
126.945, 134.178, 138.926, 129.19, 162.319), col3 = c(9.833, 
10.917, 16.917, 22.333, 9.167, 8.167, 11.167, 14.667, 12.167, 
11.667, 10, 9.5, 9.833, 9.833), col4 = c(4.194, 3.708, 6.333, 
10.389, 4.25, 3, 4.278, 6.444, 4.639, 5.056, 4.639, 4.222, 3.833, 
4.118), cr = structure(c(1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 
1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L), .Label = c("A", "B"), class = "factor")), .Names = c("col1", 
"col2", "col3", "col4", "cr"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
-14L))

Now. to address your question. You need to first aggregate the data, then convert it to a matrix, then calculate each value in the matrix as a proportion to the total in that column (using prop.table):

mydataAgg <- aggregate(cbind(col1, col2, col3, col4) ~ cr, mydata, sum)
mydata2 <- as.matrix(mydata1[-1])
rownames(mydata2) <- mydataAgg[[1]]
mydata2
#   col1     col2    col3   col4
# A 1235 1527.057 110.250 46.673
# B  575  697.967  55.918 22.430
prop.table(mydata2, 2)
#        col1      col2      col3      col4
# A 0.6823204 0.6863103 0.6634851 0.6754121
# B 0.3176796 0.3136897 0.3365149 0.3245879

Plotting is then easy:

barplot(prop.table(mydata2, 2))

Or, with colors:

barplot(prop.table(mydata2, 2), col = c("slateblue", "palevioletred"))

enter image description here

Hmmm. Not the most interesting plot, but I guess definitely a clear pattern in proportions....


lattice

@Arun showed the ggplot2 solution in the name of completeness, but if that's the case, then we should at least add barchart from "lattice". ;)

For this, we need to transpose the output of prop.table(mydata2, 2) that we calculated earlier:

barchart(t(prop.table(mydata2, 2)), stack = TRUE, horizontal = FALSE)

Here's the result:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
(+1) especially for the reaction after looking at the plot. Hmmm.. not the most interesting plot.. :) –  Arun Jan 30 '13 at 13:31
    
I wish I could (+1). I've got to learn lattice! –  Arun Jan 30 '13 at 15:25

For the sake of completeness, here's the ggplot2 solution (using @AnandaMahto's data, thank you for the dput output). I use melt first and then use data.table to count and obtain proportions (all internal calculations basically):

require(ggplot2)
require(reshape2)
require(data.table)

df.m <- melt(df, names(df)[5], names(df)[1:4])
dt <- data.table(df.m)
setkey(dt, "cr", "variable")
dt.m <- dt[, list(count = sum(value)), by=list(cr,variable)]
dt.m <- dt.m[, list(cr=cr, prop = count/sum(count)), by=variable]
p <- ggplot(data = dt.m, aes(factor(variable))) + 
         geom_bar(aes(group = cr, weights=prop, fill=cr))
p <- p + scale_fill_brewer(palette = "Set1")
p

ggplot2_barplot_stacked

share|improve this answer
1  
ggplot2 is simply a better way to do graphs. I'm of the view that the built-in plotting functions should always be ignored in favour of it. –  Jack Aidley Jan 30 '13 at 13:34
    
Even though, sometimes you don't want to follow the grammar of graphics, where base plotting comes in handy... –  Arun Jan 30 '13 at 13:37
1  
Granted. Imagine appending "unless there's a good reason" to the end of my last comment. –  Jack Aidley Jan 30 '13 at 13:54
1  
+1 for completeness, but you forgot to add lattice, so I've updated my answer. –  Ananda Mahto Jan 30 '13 at 15:24

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