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I have a model like below

public sealed class Person
{
        public string MobileNo { get; set; }
        public string Firstname { get; set; }
        public string Lastname { get; set; }
}

In my implmentation class, I have a method which takes an IEnumerable as a parameter

public string PersonList(string listName, IEnumerable<Person> persons)
{
   dictionary.Add("name", new String[1] { listname }); 
   dictionary.Add("list", persons.ToArray());

    PrivateMethod("personList", dictionary);
}

I have another private method

private string PrivateMethod(string value, Dictionary<string, object[]> parameters)
{
    foreach (KeyValuePair<string, object[]> kvp in parameters)
    {
           Person[] persons = kvp.Value.Cast<Person>().ToArray();

           [...]
    }

[...]
}

I want to make this above method reusable, and don't want to put "Person" model tightly-coupled.

Can I use dynamic ?

ContactList(string listName, IEnumerable<dynamic> persons)

And within the private method

dynamic[] persons = kvp.Value.Cast<How to pass model here>().ToArray();

Solution:

This will work, great.

 dynamic[] persons = kvp.Value.Cast<dynamic>().ToArray();

Thanks to usr & Rune FS

share|improve this question
1  
What do you want to do with persons? What about .Cast<dynamic>()? –  usr Jan 30 '13 at 12:19
    
@usr: Will it .Cast<dynamic>() work? –  Shubhajyoti Ghosh Jan 30 '13 at 12:26
    
@ShubhajyotiGhosh try :) –  Rune FS Jan 30 '13 at 12:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Have you tried using "Interfaces" in c#? you can cast any object to any type as long as they are all derived to the same type of interface.

interface IPerson
{
    string MobileNo { get; set; }
    string Name { get; set; }
    string LastName { get; set; }
}

class Person : IPerson
{
    public string MobileNo { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
}

class execute
{
    private Dictionary<string, object[]> dictionary = new Dictionary<string,object[]>();

    public void run()
    {
        List<IPerson> persons = new List<IPerson>();
        persons.Add(new Person()
        {
            LastName = "asdf",
            Name = "asdf",
            MobileNo = "123123"
        });

        persons.Add(new Person()
        {
            LastName = "aaaa",
            Name = "dddd",
            MobileNo = "1231232"
        });

        string x = PersonList("somelistname", persons);
    }


    public string PersonList(string listName, IEnumerable<IPerson> persons)
    {
        //dictionary.Add("name", new String[1] { listName });
        dictionary.Add("list", persons.ToArray());

        return PrivateMethod("personList", dictionary);
    }

    private string PrivateMethod(string value, Dictionary<string, object[]> parameters)
    {
        foreach (KeyValuePair<string, object[]> kvp in parameters)
        {
            IPerson[] persons = kvp.Value.Cast<IPerson>().ToArray();

        }

        return "somestring";
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Nice approach, thanks. Actually I used Interface in the original code block. And If I am not wrong, your approach satisfy DI standard. –  Shubhajyoti Ghosh Jan 30 '13 at 12:58
1  
Note that this solution, while sufficient for the OP, still limits you to -in this case- the IPerson interface, whereas generics are much more powerful re. the topic. –  pleinolijf Jan 30 '13 at 13:12

You could make the PrivateMethod generic:

private string PrivateMethod<T>(string value, Dictionary<string, object[]> parameters)
{
    foreach (KeyValuePair<string, object[]> kvp in parameters)
    {
           T[] items = kvp.Value.Cast<T>().ToArray();
           [...]
    }

    [...]
}
share|improve this answer
    
Then I have to make class as Generic, like Sample<T> . Otherwise How I pass T into Private method ? –  Shubhajyoti Ghosh Jan 30 '13 at 12:30
1  
Like this: PrivateMethod<Person>("personList", dictionary);. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 30 '13 at 12:45
    
If I write this PrivateMethod<Person>, then I have to take the reference of the Model within the implementation class. Which I don't want. As because right now it is Person. but it can be any thing depends on need. –  Shubhajyoti Ghosh Jan 30 '13 at 12:51
1  
@ShubhajyotiGhosh: I'm not sure if you understand. You can call the PrivateMethod with any type you want (that's what <T> stands for), as it will be replaced with the type you pass along to the method (like Person). I suggest you read up on Generics over at MSDN. –  pleinolijf Jan 30 '13 at 12:54

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