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This is a part of my code.

clear all;
clc;
p = 50;
t = [-6 : 0.01 : 6];
f = inline('(t+2).*sin(t)', 't')
v = inline('3*f(p*t+2)','t','f','p')
plot(t,f(t));
v(t,f,p);
figure;
plot(t,v(t,f,p));

Here I have two questions.

  1. Why I have to pass p into the function v even though p is a constant which has already declared ?
  2. How I can get an expression for v completely in terms of t as 3*[(50*t+2)*sin(50*t+2)] or in its simplified form ?

Update
This is an update for the second question

Let

f(x) = 1 + x - x^2
g(x) = sin(x)

If I give f(g(x)), I wanna get the output in words, like this

f(g(x)) = (cos(X))^2 + sin(x)

not in numerical value. Is there any function capable to do that?

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3 Answers 3

How about using anonymous functions:

p = 50;
t = -6:0.01:6;
f = @(x) (x+2).*sin(x);
v = @(x) 3*f(p*x+2);
figure;
subplot(1,2,1); plot( t, f(t) ); title('f(t)');
subplot(1,2,2); plot( t, v(t) ); title('v(t)');

Is this what you wanted?

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Please see my update –  noufal Jan 31 '13 at 14:15

1) Why do I have to pass p to v even though p is a constant which has already been declared?

Well, a MATLAB's inline function object has an eval wrapper, so the only variables in its scope are those which were automatically captured from the expression or explicitly specified.

In other words, if you want v to recognize p, you have no other option but declaring it when creating the inline object and passing it to v explicitly. The same goes for f as well!

2) How I can get an expression for v completely in terms of t as 3*[(50*t+2)*sin(50*t+2)] or in its simplified form?

Use anonymous functions, like Shai suggested. They are more powerful, more elegant and much faster. For instance:

v = @(t)(3*(50*t+2)*sin(50*t+2))

Note that if you use a name, which is already in use by a variable, as an argument, the anonymous function will treat it as an argument first. It does see other variables in the scope, so doing something like g = @(x)(x + p) is also possible.

EDIT #1:
Here's another example, this time a function of a function:

x = 1:5;
f = @(x)(x .^ 3);        %// Here x is a local variable, not as defined above
g = @(x)(x + 2);         %// Here x is also a local variable
result = f(g(x)); 

or alternatively define yet another function that implements that:

h = @(x)f(g(x));         %// Same result as h = @(x)((x + 2) .^ 3)
result = h(x);

The output should be the same.

EDIT #2:

If you want to make an anonymous function out of the expression string, concatenate the '@(x)' (or the correct anonymous header, as you see fit) to the beginning and apply eval, for example:

expr = '(x + 2) .^ 3';
f = eval(['@(x)', expr]) %// Same result as f = @(x)((x + 2) .^ 3)

Note that you can also do char(f) to convert it back into a string, but you'll have to manually get rid of the '@(...)' part.

EDIT #3:
If you're looking for a different solution, you can explore the Symbolic Toolbox. For example, try:

syms x
f(x) = x + 2
g(x) = x ^ 3

or can also use sym, like so:

f(x) = sym('x + 2');
g(x) = sym('x ^ 3');

Use subs to substitute values and evaluate the symbolic expression.

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How i can get a simplified form of a function of a function in MATLAB, like, f(x) = x^3, g(x) = (X+2), f(g(x)) = (x+2)^3. If I give f(g(x)) as input I want (x+2)^3 in the output. Any MATLAB function for equation simplification...? Not necessary it should be using inline function... –  noufal Jan 30 '13 at 14:02
    
@noufal The principle is pretty much covered in Shai's answer, but I've also added a clarification in my answer. –  Eitan T Jan 30 '13 at 14:28
    
Ok. I understood it can give the output values of f(g(X)), But I want the put as (x+2)^3 as a string... –  noufal Jan 30 '13 at 14:40
    
@noufal Please see my second edit. Did it help? –  Eitan T Jan 30 '13 at 19:28
    
Not completely...Is there any function in symbolic math tool box for doing the same...? –  noufal Jan 31 '13 at 1:22

Adding a constant into an inline can be done during its definition. Instead of

p = 50;
v = inline('3*f(p*t+2)','t','f','p')

You can write

p = 50;
v = inline(  sprintf('3*f(%f*t+2)', p), 't','f')
share|improve this answer
    
Please see my update –  noufal Jan 31 '13 at 14:14

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