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Why is the answer for the below code 16? Can anybody explain the working of this program?

#define SQUARE(n) n*n
void main()
{
    int j;      
    j =16/SQUARE(2);

    printf("\n j=%d",j);
    getch();
}

If we write the same code like below, then the answer is 4:

//the ans is 4 why?
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

#define SQUARE(n) n*n

void main()
{
    int j;      
    j =16/(SQUARE(2));

    printf("\n j=%d",j);
    getch();
}
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1  
This is one of many reasons why you should avoid function-like macros. –  Lundin Jan 30 '13 at 13:40
1  
To parenthesis or not to parenthesis. That is the question. And the answer is use parenthesis whenever you write expressions. –  Marius Bancila Jan 30 '13 at 13:45
    
Yes, many unexpected things will happen for beginners espicially. –  Arvind Lairenjam Jan 30 '13 at 13:45
1  
Note that if you had written j = 16 / SQUARE(1 + 1);, your answer would be 18, but if you had written j = 16 / (SQUARE(1 + 1));, your answer would have been 5. Also, the return type of main() should be int. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '13 at 13:54

9 Answers 9

The preprocessor just replaces the text, exactly as written.

So, the macro call SQUARE(2) becomes literally 2*2.

In your case, that means the whole expression becomes 16/2*2, which because of C's precedence rules evaluates to (16/2)*2, i.e. 16.

Macros should always be enclosed in parenthesis, and have each argument enclosed as well.

If we do that, we get:

#define SQUARE(n)  ((n) * (n))

which replaces to 16/((2) * (2)), which evaluates as 16/4, i.e. 4.

The parens around each argument makes things like SQUARE(1+1) work as expected, without them a call such as 16/SQUARE(1+1) would become 16/(1+1*1+1) which is 16/3, i.e. not at all what you'd want.

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Superb explaination. Thank you so much unwind. –  Arvind Lairenjam Jan 30 '13 at 13:36

Order of operations. Your expression is evaluating to:

 j = 16 / 2 * 2

which equals 16. Make it:

#define SQUARE(n) (n*n) 

which will force the square to be evaluated first.

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Now, i know the answer. Thank you. –  Arvind Lairenjam Jan 30 '13 at 13:27

You need to define your macro with insulating parentheses, like so:

 #define SQUARE(n) ((n)*(n))

Otherwise

 j = 16/SQUARE(2);

expands to

j = 16 / 2 * 2;   which is equivalent to (16 / 2) * 2

When what you want is

j = 16 / (2 * 2);   
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Mitch Wheat thank you so much. I got it now. –  Arvind Lairenjam Jan 30 '13 at 13:23

1. When using macros that are to be used as expressions, you should parenthesise the whole macro body.

This prevents erroneous expansions like:

#define SQUARE(x) x*x
-SQUARE(5,5)
// becomes -5 * 5

2. If the macro arguments are expreessions, you should parenthesise them too.

This prevents a different type of problems:

#define SQUARE(x) x*x
SQUARE(5+2)
// becomes 5 + 2*5 + 2

Hence the correct way is to write it like this:

#define square(n) ((n)*(n))
-SQUARE(5+2)
// becomes -((5+2)*(5+2))

Using macros as functions is discouraged though (guess why), so use a function instead. For instance:

inline double square(n) { return n*n; }
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Thank you Kos. Thanks for you explaination. –  Arvind Lairenjam Jan 31 '13 at 5:26

The Expansion of macro will be like:

  j = 16/SQUARE(2);
  j = 16/2*2;

Which is equal to : j = (16/2)*2; Means j = 16;

and :

 j = 16/(SQUARE(2));
 j = 16/(2*2);

Which is equal to : j = 16/4; Means j = 4;

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Thank you Midhun, I got it now. –  Arvind Lairenjam Jan 30 '13 at 13:23

Because the macro will be expanded as:

j = 16/2*2;

The pre-compiler does not do any processing on the expansion. It places the expanded macro in your code as it is. Since you have not parenthesized the replacement text it wont do it for you in the main code as well. Make it :

#define SQUARE(n) ((n)*(n))
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Thank you Deepankar, Now I know it. –  Arvind Lairenjam Jan 30 '13 at 13:26
1  
Although your alternative definition is better, it runs into problems with SQUARE(1+1), which gives 3 with your code. Parenthesize each argument, and the expression as a whole: #define SQUARE(n) ((n) * (n)). –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '13 at 14:01
    
@JonathanLeffler perfect. –  Deepankar Bajpeyi Jan 30 '13 at 14:07

The first example is evaluated as:

16 / 2 * 2
(16 / 2) * 2
8 * 2
16

The second example is evaluated as:

16 / (2 * 2)
16 / 4
4

Add parenthesis to you preprocessor statement to control the order of operations:

#define SQUARE(n) ((n)*(n))

The outer parenthesis in ((n)*(n)) ensure that n is squared before any outside operation is performed. The inner parenthesis (n) ensure that n is correctly evaluated in cases where you pass an expression to SQUARE like so:

16 / SQUARE(2 * 2)
16 / ((2 * 2)*(2 * 2))
16 / (4 * 4)
16 / 16
1
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Yes Nocturno, now I understand. Thank you so much. –  Arvind Lairenjam Jan 30 '13 at 13:49

you'll get

j =16/2*2; // (16 / 2) * 2 = 8
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1  
I think 16/2*2 is same as (16/2)*2 so it is 16. Thank you Johann –  Arvind Lairenjam Jan 30 '13 at 13:25
Its because Whenever macro name is used, it is replaced by the contents of the macro.its simple rule of working of macro.


Case 1 : result 16

        define SQUARE(n) n*n
        void main()
         {
            int j;      
            j =16/SQUARE(2);

          printf("\n j=%d",j);
          getch();
       }

its get expand as below


j =16/SQUARE(2); 

so in place of SQUARE(2) it will replace 2*2 because Macro is SQUARE(n) n*n

j = 16/2*2
j = (16/2)*2
j = 8*2
j =16



Case 2 : result 4



        define SQUARE(n) n*n

        void main()
       {
            int j;      
            j =16/(SQUARE(2));

          printf("\n j=%d",j);
          getch();
       }



its get expand as below


j =16/(SQUARE(2));

so in place of SQUARE(2) it will replace 2*2 because Macro is SQUARE(n) n*n

j = 16/(2*2)
j = 16/(4)
j = 4


Hope this will help
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Yes that was helpful Ganesh. Thank you. –  Arvind Lairenjam Jan 31 '13 at 5:32
    
Your most welcome Arvind –  Ganesh Jan 31 '13 at 7:35

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